• Welcome!
Total books

Academic

Academic Articles
37
Anthropology
1
Communications
4
Economics
146

Engineering
84
History
88
Humanities and Arts
25
LGBT Studies
1

Mathematics
40
Medical and Health
59
Memoirs & Biography
65
Philosophy
157

Postmodernism
1
Psychology & Culture
118
Religion
81
Science
188

Sociology
100
Teacher's Resources
2
Technology
30
Travel
21

Encyclopedia
6
Dictionary
14
Sort by
Towards a Nonlinear Quantum Physics (Contemporary Chemical Physics)

The author of this book presents conceptual and experimental evidence showing that Heisenberg's uncertainty relations are not valid in all cases. Furthermore, he derives a more general set of uncertainty relations. The new relations result from the replacement of the Fourier nonlocal and nontemporal paradigm by wavelet local analysis. These results lead to a coherent and beautiful causal synthesis unifying quantum and classical physics.

Food Poisoning: Outbreaks, Bacterial Sources and Adverse Health Effects (Food and Beverage Consumption and Health)

Hygienic food and water are essential for healthy life. Outbreaks of pathogens and chemical food poisoning occur regularly in this world, which kills around 2.2 million people globally every year. Food recalls due to the presence of food-borne pathogens and toxic chemicals are a nightmare for world economical growth. Even in the 21st century, due to the biological diversity and low infection dose, it is a continual challenge to prevent infectious disease outbreaks due to harmful pathogens. To tackle these challenges, the source of food poisoning and adverse health effects are one of the fastest growing research and technology areas in the last twenty years. This book contains ten chapters covering basic science to possible device design which can have immense applications in our society.

Pseudolinear Functions and Optimization

Pseudolinear Functions and Optimization is the first book to focus exclusively on pseudolinear functions, a class of generalized convex functions. It discusses the properties, characterizations, and applications of pseudolinear functions in nonlinear optimization problems. The book describes the characterizations of solution sets of various optimization problems. It examines multiobjective pseudolinear, multiobjective fractional pseudolinear, static minmax pseudolinear, and static minmax fractional pseudolinear optimization problems and their results. The authors extend these results to locally Lipschitz functions using Clarke subdifferentials. They also present optimality and duality results for h-pseudolinear and semi-infinite pseudolinear optimization problems. The authors go on to explore the relationships between vector variational inequalities and vector optimization problems involving pseudolinear functions. They present characterizations of solution sets of pseudolinear optimization problems on Riemannian manifolds as well as results on pseudolinearity of quadratic fractional functions. The book also extends n-pseudolinear functions to pseudolinear and n-pseudolinear fuzzy mappings and characterizations of solution sets of pseudolinear fuzzy optimization problems and n-pseudolinear fuzzy optimization problems. The text concludes with some applications of pseudolinear optimization problems to hospital management and economics. This book encompasses nearly all the published literature on the subject along with new results on semi-infinite nonlinear programming problems. It will be useful to readers from mathematical programming, industrial engineering, and operations management.

Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problem Solving: An Introduction to Mathematical Thinking

A Classroom-Tested, Alternative Approach to Teaching Math for Liberal Arts Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problem Solving: An Introduction to Mathematical Thinking uses puzzles and paradoxes to introduce basic principles of mathematical thought. The text is designed for students in liberal arts mathematics courses. Decision-making situations that progress from recreational problems to important contemporary applications develop the critical-thinking skills of non-science and non-technical majors. The logical underpinnings of this textbook were developed and refined throughout many years of classroom feedback and in response to commentary from presentations at national conferences. The text’s five units focus on graphs, logic, probability, voting, and cryptography. The authors also cover related areas, such as operations research, game theory, number theory, combinatorics, statistics, and circuit design. The text uses a core set of common representations, strategies, and algorithms to analyze diverse games, puzzles, and applications. This unified treatment logically connects the topics with a recurring set of solution approaches. Requiring no mathematical prerequisites, this book helps students explore creative mathematical thinking and enhance their own critical-thinking skills. Students will acquire quantitative literacy and appreciation of mathematics through the text’s unified approach and wide range of interesting applications.

Insect Molecular Biology and Ecology

Insects represent the most abundant and diverse animal group on Earth. The number of described species is more than one million and up to ten million are estimated. Insects have one of the widest distributions in the world because they have adapted to extreme ranges of environments. Molecular ecology studies ecological processes based on the analysis of biomacromolecules, particularly DNA, RNA, and proteins, but also of low-molecular weight signal compounds. Molecular ecology uses the exciting opportunities offered by the tools of molecular biology. The book presents current entomological research, where molecular tools help to advance traditional ecological studies. Chapters include ones on insect–insect and insect–plant interactions, on mechanisms of environmental adaptation, or on the use of insect biotechnology in pest and vector control. The book helps to combine powerful methods in molecular biology with exciting issues in ecology to understand why insects became "masters of survival."

Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology

New York Times Bestseller and an Amazon Best Science Book of 2015, Life on the Edge alters our understanding of our world's fundamental dynamics through the use of quantum mechanics Life is the most extraordinary phenomenon in the known universe; but how did it come to be? Even in an age of cloning and artificial biology, the remarkable truth remains: nobody has ever made anything living entirely out of dead material. Life remains the only way to make life. Are we still missing a vital ingredient in its creation? Using first-hand experience at the cutting edge of science, Jim Al-Khalili and Johnjoe Macfadden reveal that missing ingredient to be quantum mechanics. Drawing on recent ground-breaking experiments around the world, each chapter in Life on the Edge illustrates one of life's puzzles: How do migrating birds know where to go? How do we really smell the scent of a rose? How do our genes copy themselves with such precision? Life on the Edge accessibly reveals how quantum mechanics can answer these probing questions of the universe. Guiding the reader through the rapidly unfolding discoveries of the last few years, Al-Khalili and McFadden describe the explosive new field of quantum biology and its potentially revolutionary applications, while offering insights into the biggest puzzle of all: what is life? As they brilliantly demonstrate in these groundbreaking pages, life exists on the quantum edge. – Winner, Stephen Hawking Medal for Science Communication

More Than Honey: The Survival of Bees and the Future of Our World

“If 70 percent of all cattle or 30 percent of all chickens were to die annually, states of emergency would be declared everywhere. The death of bees is at least that dramatic and with even more far-reaching consequences.” More Than Honey, the book based on the award-winning documentary of the same name, takes us on a global tour of the world of bees, introducing us along the way to “killer bees,” Frankenbees, beekeepers, and human pollinators. Markus Imhoof and Claus-Peter Lieckfeld examine both the history and current status of our relationship to and reliance on bees, and expose the human behaviors that are contributing to the decline of the bee population—a decline that could ultimately contribute directly to a world food problem. The authors intersperse information about the intricate social structure of the bee world and the problems faced by bees—ranging from the ubiquitous Varroa destructor to overuse of pesticides and an ever-shrinking natural landscape—with conversations and interviews with beekeepers and bee experts from across the world, balancing the views of those who see bees as simply a valuable source of income with the views of those who see bees as undervalued, misunderstood creatures that need our help to survive. The end result is a fascinating, accessible overview of a species that is crucial to our survival.

Environmental Hazards and Neurodevelopment: Where Ecology and Well-Being Connect

This title includes a number of Open Access chapters. The rate of identification of children with neurobiological disabilities has been on the increase in recent years. Millions of dollars in research are being spent to understand the factors influencing these increases. The articles within this compendium shed vital light on this issue, confirming that various "ordinary" chemical hazards―of the sort encountered by countless children in their everyday lives―are having serious impacts on development. This volume investigates the impact of exposure to tobacco smoke, household chemicals, lead, agricultural toxins, and flame retardants.

Isochronous Systems
Isochronous Systems Sented by Steve Bark

A dynamical system is called isochronous if it features in its phase space an open, fully-dimensional region where all its solutions are periodic in all its degrees of freedom with the same, fixed period. Recently a simple transformation has been introduced, applicable to quite a large class of dynamical systems, that yields autonomous systems which are isochronous. This justifies the notion that isochronous systems are not rare. In this book the procedure to manufacture isochronous systems is reviewed, and many examples of such systems are provided. Examples include many-body problems characterized by Newtonian equations of motion in spaces of one or more dimensions, Hamiltonian systems, and also nonlinear evolution equations (PDEs). The book shall be of interest to students and researchers working on dynamical systems, including integrable and nonintegrable models, with a finite or infinite number of degrees of freedom. It might be used as a basic textbook, or as backup material for an undergraduate or graduate course.

What Is Biodiversity?
What Is Biodiversity? Sented by Steve Bark

In the life sciences, there is wide-ranging debate about biodiversity. While nearly everyone is in favor of biodiversity and its conservation, methods for its assessment vary enormously. So what exactly is biodiversity? Most theoretical work on the subject assumes it has something to do with species richness—with the number of species in a particular region—but in reality, it is much more than that. Arguing that we cannot make rational decisions about what it is to be protected without knowing what biodiversity is, James Maclaurin and Kim Sterelny offer in What Is Biodiversity? a theoretical and conceptual exploration of the biological world and how diversity is valued. Here, Maclaurin and Sterelny explore not only the origins of the concept of biodiversity, but also how that concept has been shaped by ecology and more recently by conservation biology. They explain the different types of biodiversity important in evolutionary theory, developmental biology, ecology, morphology and taxonomy and conclude that biological heritage is rich in not just one biodiversity but many. Maclaurin and Sterelny also explore the case for the conservation of these biodiversities using option value theory, a tool borrowed from economics. An erudite, provocative, timely, and creative attempt to answer a fundamental question, What Is Biodiversity? will become a foundational text in the life sciences and studies thereof.

Salmonella: Prevalence, Risk Factors and Treatment Options

The ability of various microorganisms to attach to surfaces and create biofilms on them is rather a cause of concern for many industries, including for those occupied with food production and processing. Thus, the attachment of bacterial pathogens to food processing equipment is considered as an essential contributing factor in foodborne disease outbreaks, since this may ultimately lead to the contamination of food products. Improperly cleaned surfaces promote soil build-up, and, in the presence of water, contribute to the development of microbial biofilms which may contain pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella. Salmonella enterica is one of the most significant enteric foodborne bacterial pathogens, with host-adapted strains able to cause systemic human infections and persist for long periods of time, posing significant public health problems. This book discusses the prevalence, risk factors and treatment options of Salmonella.

Memory, 2nd Edition
Memory, 2nd Edition Sented by Steve Bark

This best-selling textbook presents a comprehensive and accessible overview of the study of memory. Written by three of the world’s leading researchers in the field, it contains everything the student needs to know about the scientific approach to memory and its applications. Each chapter of the book is written by one of the three authors, an approach which takes full advantage of their individual expertise and style, creating a more personal and accessible text. This enhances students’ enjoyment of the book, allowing them to share the authors’ own fascination with human memory. The book also draws on a wealth of real-world examples throughout, showing students exactly how they can relate science to their everyday experiences of memory. Key features of this edition: Thoroughly revised throughout to include the latest research and updated coverage of key ideas and models A brand new chapter on Memory and the Brain, designed to give students a solid understanding of methods being used to study the relationship between memory and the brain, as well as the neurobiological basis of memory Additional pedagogical features to help students engage with the material, including many ‘try this’ demonstrations, points for discussion, and bullet-pointed chapter summaries The book is supported by a companion website featuring extensive online resources for students and lecturers.

Plant Bioactive Compounds for Pancreatic Cancer Prevention and Treatment (Cancer Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatments)

With the rapid advancements in medical research, diagnostic technology and increased public health initiative and awareness, overall cancer death rates in western societies are declining each year with the number of deaths from major cancers such as breast, colorectal and lung following this trend. However, the survival rate for those with pancreatic cancer has been at a standstill for over four decades and there are concerns that pancreatic cancer may become the second deadliest cancer in the US by the year 2030. The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer has dire consequences as it presents late in its course and is rapidly progressive. This is clearly one of the most devastating of human cancers, and as there are very few treatment options for those with the disease, new approaches and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. For thousands of years, plants have been used as traditional indigenous remedies for a variety of ailments in many parts of the world. It is thought that approximately 80% of the rural population worldwide still relies on plants as medicines. Plants have assumed the greatest prominence as a source of medicinal compounds with thousands of species associated with the treatment of cancers or conditions with cancer-like symptoms. Scientific evaluation of a range of traditional medicines has lead to the development of highly effective cancer therapeutic agents, and it is estimated that approximately 50% of all pharmaceuticals currently available for administration are still derived from natural origins. With this in mind, within the plant kingdom there remains great potential for the development of novel therapeutic agents with significant efficacy against pancreatic cancer. With our increasing understanding of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer and the rapid advancement of DNA sequencing technology to understand the structure of the genome and infer biology, pancreatic cancer is one of the most appropriate diseases to test multiple novel plant derived therapeutics in a molecular phenotype driven personalized approach. In this book, we aim to highlight the challenges of therapeutic efficacy facing pancreatic cancer patients as well as providing up-to-date information concerning the heterogeneity of pancreatic cancer and the consequent hurdles for therapeutic development. We describe the development of plant derived compounds into clinically used anti-cancer agents; a concise history of plant phytochemicals as traditional medicines, as well as their numerous health benefits; a summary of the bioactive composition of plants and plant foods; their extraction and isolation methods; the synthetic complexities and strategies for selected chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer; as well as an overview of medicinal plants with anti-cancer properties from selected regions around the world. It is clear that the plant-derived compounds described in this book represent a mere tip of the iceberg when it comes to the thousands of plant species with potential medicinal efficacy. However we hope to enlighten our readers on the issues and complexities concerning the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer and identify the realistic potential for the development of novel therapeutic agents derived from plants.

Philosophy of Song and Singing: An Introduction

In Philosophy of Song and Singing: An Introduction, Jeanette Bicknell explores key aesthetic, ethical, and other philosophical questions that have not yet been thoroughly researched by philosophers, musicologists, or scientists. Issues addressed include: The relationship between the meaning of a song's words and its music The performer's role and the ensuing gender complications, social ontology, and personal identity The performer's ethical obligations to audiences, composers, lyricists, and those for whom the material holds particular significance The metaphysical status of isolated solo performances compared to the continuous singing of opera or the interrupted singing of stage and screen musicals Each chapter focuses on one major musical example and includes several shorter discussions of other selections. All have been chosen for their illustrative power and their accessibility for any interested reader and are readily available.

Forgotten Ideas, Neglected Pioneers

Richard Semon was a German evolutionary biologist who wrote, during the first decade of the twentieth century, two fascinating analyses of the workings of human memory which were ahead of their time. Although these have been virtually unknown to modern researchers, Semon's work has been rediscovered during the past two decades and has begun to have an influence on the field. This book not only examines Semon's contribution to memory research, but also tells the story of an extraordinary life set against the background of a turbulent period in European history and major developments in science and evolutionary theory. The resulting book is an engaging blend of biographical, historical and psychological material.

Prenatal and Childhood Nutrition: Evaluating the Neurocognitive Connections

This title includes a number of Open Access chapters. Nutrition is not only a basic need that all humans have to sustain life, but it is also critical to successful early development. This research compendium lends deeper insights into the links between nutrition and healthy brain function―and from the reverse perspective, between nutrition and neurocognitive disorders. This well-organized and accessible compendium offers a vital research context for policymakers, educators, medical providers, and families. It underlines our urgent responsibility to give children a strong start by improving prenatal and early childhood nutrition.

Reverence: Renewing a Forgotten Virtue

Reverence is an ancient virtue that survives among us in half-forgotten patterns of civility and moments of inarticulate awe. Reverence gives meaning to much that we do, yet the word has almost passed out of our vocabulary. Reverence, says philosopher and classicist Paul Woodruff, begins in an understanding of human limitations. From this grows the capacity to be in awe of whatever we believe lies outside our control -- God, truth, justice, nature, even death. It is a quality of character that is especially important in leadership and in teaching, although it figures in virtually every human relationship. It transcends religious boundaries and can be found outside religion altogether. Woodruff draws on thinking about this lost virtue in ancient Greek and Chinese traditions and applies lessons from these highly reverent cultures to today's world. The book covers reverence in a variety of contexts -- the arts, leadership, teaching, warfare, and the home -- and shows how essential a quality it is to a well-functioning society. First published by Oxford University Press in 2001, this new edition of Reverence is revised and expanded. It contains a foreword by Betty Sue Flowers, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin, a new preface, two new chapters -- one on the sacred and one on compassion -- and an epilogue focused on renewing reverence in our own lives.

The Stressed Sex: Uncovering the Truth About Men, Women, and Mental Health

Every day millions of people struggle with psychological and emotional problems. The Stressed Sex sets out to answer a simple, but crucial, question: are rates of psychological disorder different for men and women? To date, this important issue has been largely ignored in debates focused on gender differences. Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman present a groundbreaking combination of epidemiological analysis and evidence-based science to get to the bottom of what's really going on. They provide an in-depth look at what the best and most comprehensive epidemiological surveys tell us about rates of specific psychological problems, and mental ill-health in general, across a range of countries. Weighing the evidence from epidemiology, genetics, neuroscience, psychiatry, and cognitive, social, and clinical psychology, they conclude--in a finding that is sure to provoke lively debate--that in any given year, women are more vulnerable to suffer mental problems. The Freemans then explore the social, psychological, and biological factors that could account for this difference between the sexes. And they tackle other far-reaching questions as well. What is mental illness? How prevalent is it in society? How are such conditions best defined and diagnosed? What causes psychological disorders? How do we balance the various contributing factors? This is a highly charged issue. To say that women are less mentally healthy than men can threaten women's struggle for equality in society. But if women are more vulnerable to psychological problems, it is a major public health finding--one that should inform treatment, guide research, and perhaps spark social change. The Freemans show us that it is an issue we cannot ignore.

Mechanobiology of the Endothelium

The endothelium is an excellent example of where biology meets physics and engineering. It must convert mechanical forces into chemical signals to maintain homeostasis. It also controls the immune response, drug delivery through the vasculature, and cancer metastasis. Basic understanding of these processes is starting to emerge and the knowledge gained from research is now being used in applications from drug delivery to imaging modalities. This book reviews current knowledge in mechanobiology of the endothelium and its implications for the development of theranostic devices.

Agricultural Finance: From Crops to Land, Water and Infrastructure

A comprehensive resource for understanding the complexities ofagricultural finance Agricultural Finance: From Crops to Land, Water, andInfrastructure is a pioneering book that offers a comprehensiveresource for understanding the worldwide agriculture markets, fromspikes in agricultural commodity prices to trading strategies, andthe agribusiness industry generally to the challenges of feedingthe planet in particular. The book also goes in-depth on the topicsof land, water, fertilizers, biofuels, and ethanol. Written byHelyette Geman—an industry expert in commodityderivatives—this book explores the agricultural marketplaceand the cycles in agricultural commodity prices that can be the keyto investor success. This resource addresses a wide range of other important topicsas well, including agricultural insurance, energy, shipping andbunker prices, sustainability, investments in land, subsidies,agricultural derivatives, and farming risk-management. Other topicscovered include structured products and agricultural commoditiesETFs; trade finance in an era of credit shortage; securitizationand commodity-linked notes; grains: wheat, corn, soybeans; softs:coffee, cocoa, cotton; shipping as a key component of agriculturaltrade; and the major agricultural shipping routes and the costs.The book: Offers the first comprehensive resource that deals with the allaspects of agricultural finance Includes information that is crucial for pension funds, assetmanagers, hedge funds, agribusiness corporates, CTAs andregulators Covers a range of topics from agricultural bunker prices,futures, options to major shipping routes and the costs This text is a must-have resource for accessing the informationrequired to trade successfully in the agricultural marketplace.

Sort by