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Boomer Bust?: Economic and Political Issues of the Graying Society (2 Volumes)

Seventy-six million Baby Boomers are careening toward retirement in the United States. Demographic shifts toward aging populations are taking place around the Western world, as a variety of factors―biological, technological, medical, and sociocultural―are extending life spans. Meanwhile, birth rates are declining. The scaremongers argue that this generational shift is going to be disastrous: It will result in skyrocketing tax rates, lower retirement and health benefits, higher inflation, increased unemployment and poverty, political instability, and a host of other societal ills. But will it? In Boomer Bust?, Robert Hudson assembles leading authors from fields such as economics, political science, and finance to separate fact from fiction, highlight the terms of debate, and showcase innovative policies that will prevent disaster from occurring. From topics like Social Security to older people rejoining the workforce to the elderly as a political lobby, this two-volume set covers the gamut of economic, political, financial, and business issues related to aging. The Boomer generation will leave one of the largest footprints the world has yet seen. In retirement, as in all else, this generation is blazing a path affecting succeeding generations profoundly. Boomer Bust? charts a path through the thicket of personal and public policy choices facing not just Baby Boomers but all of society.

The Routledge Guidebook to Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks (The Routledge Guides to the Great Books)

Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks are one of the most important and original sources of modern political philosophy but the Prison Notebooks present great difficulties to the reader. Not originally intended for publication, their fragmentary character and their often cryptic language can mystify readers, leading to misinterpretation of the text. The Routledge Guidebook to Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks provides readers with the historical background, textual analysis and other relevant information needed for a greater understanding and appreciation of this classic text. This guidebook: Explains the arguments presented by Gramsci in a clear and straightforward way, analysing the key concepts of the notebooks. Situates Gramsci’s ideas in the context of his own time, and in the history of political thought demonstrating the innovation and originality of the Prison Notebooks. Provides critique and analysis of Gramsci’s conceptualisation of politics and history (and culture in general), with reference to contemporary (i.e. present-day) examples where relevant. Examines the relevance of Gramsci in the modern world and discusses why his ideas have such resonance in academic discourse Featuring historical and political examples to illustrate Gramsci's arguments, along with suggestions for further reading, this is an invaluable guide for anyone who wants to engage more fully with The Prison Notebooks

Ignored, Shunned, and Invisible: How the Label Retarded Has Denied Freedom and Dignity to Millions

Historically, segregation and social isolation have been recurring responses to people considered defective or deficient in some way. And it is in the midst of such a society that special educator J. David Smith wrote this book, which presents critical historical and contemporary issues in mental retardation. Told through gripping vignettes and interwoven with the story of the life of John Lovelace, a man labeled mentally retarded as a child then institutionalized and sterilized, this gripping text will make all readers reconsider not only our social policies and practices, but also our personal actions, in relation to people with mental retardation. Topics covered here include an examination of ways people have been misidentified as having disabilities, then needlessly warehoused in institutions. Coupled with the tragic story of John Lovelace, this book is one that will be long remembered by its readers, and will ideally spur them to action. This book offers new directions for the field of mental retardation, including conceptual and terminology changes regarding intellectual disabilities, and new thinking about the people whose lives have been altered by the term and the concept. Insights from parents, friends, teachers, and varied special education experts are included, as is the strong view of author Smith, who befriended Lovelace. He was often ignored, regularly avoided and treated as less than a person, as invisible, explains Smith. And Lovelace is the metaphorical island to which each chapter here returns, a vivid example of the denial of freedom and dignity to people who bear an intellectually inferior label. In the end, we see how society can promote values that inspire and challenge us to create humane and just treatment for all, or we can just look the other way when facing disturbing human needs.

Romancing Treason: The Literature of the Wars of Roses

Romancing Treason addresses the scope and significance of the secular literary culture of the Wars of the Roses, and especially of the Middle English romances that were distinctively written in prose during this period. Megan Leitch argues that the pervasive textual presence of treason during the decades c.1437-c.1497 suggests a way of conceptualising the understudied space between the Lancastrian literary culture of the early fifteenth century and the Tudor literary cultures of the early and mid-sixteenth century. Drawing upon theories of political discourse and interpellation, and of the power of language to shape social identities, this book explores the ways in which, in this textual culture, treason is both a source of anxieties about community and identity, and a way of responding to those concerns. Despite the context of decades of civil war, treason is an understudied theme even with regards to Thomas Malory's celebrated prose romance, the Morte Darthur. Leitch accordingly provides a double contribution to Malory criticism by addressing the Morte Darthur's engagement with treason, and by reading the Morte in the hitherto neglected context of the prose romances and other secular literature written by Malory's English contemporaries. This book also offers new insights into the nature and possibilities of the medieval romance genre and sheds light on understudied texts such as the prose Siege of Thebes and Siege of Troy, and the romances William Caxton translated from French. More broadly, this book contributes to reconsiderations of the relationship between medieval and early modern culture by focusing on a comparatively neglected sixty-year interval -- the interval that is customarily the dividing line, the 'no man's land' between well--but separately-studied periods in English literary studies.

Rethinking Western Approaches to Counterinsurgency: Lessons From Post-Colonial Conflict (Studies in Insurgency, Counterinsurgency and National Security)

This book critically examines the Western approach to counter-insurgency in the post-colonial era and offers a series of recommendations to address current shortfalls. The author argues that current approaches to countering insurgency rely too heavily on conflicts from the post-World War II years of waning colonialism. Campaigns conducted over half a century ago – Malaya, Aden, and Kenya among them – remain primary sources on which the United States, British, Australian, and other militaries build their guidance for dealing with insurgent threats, this though both the character of those threats and the conflict environment are significantly different than was the case in those earlier years. This book addresses the resulting inconsistencies by offering insights, analysis, and recommendations drawn from campaigns more applicable to counter-insurgency today. Eight post-colonial conflicts; to include Northern Ireland, Sierra Leone, Colombia and Iraq; provide the basis for analysis. All are examples in which counterinsurgents attained or continue to demonstrate considerable progress when taking on enterprises better known for disaster and disappointment. Recommendations resulting from these analyses challenge entrenched beliefs to serve as the impetus for essential change. Rethinking Western Approaches to Counterinsurgency will be of much interest to students of counter-insurgencies, military and strategic studies, security studies and IR in general.

Talking with the President: The Pragmatics of Presidential Language

This book provides a pragmatic analysis of presidential language. Pragmatics is concerned with "meaning in context," or the relationship between what we say and what we mean. John Wilson explores the various ways in which U.S. Presidents have used language within specific social contexts to achieve specific objectives. This includes obfuscation, misdirection, the use of metaphor or ambiguity, or in some cases simply lying. He focuses on six presidents: John F. Kennedy, Richard M. Nixon, Ronald W. Reagan, William F. Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack H. Obama. These presidents cover most of the last half of the twentieth century, and the first decade of the twenty first century, and each has been associated with a specific linguistic quality. John F. Kennedy was famed for his quality of oratory, Nixon for his manipulative use of language, Reagan for his gift of telling stories, Clinton for his ability to engage the public and to linguistically turn arguments and descriptions in particular directions. Bush, on the other hand, was famed for his inability to use language appropriately, and Obama returns us to the rhetorical flourishes of early Kennedy. In the case of each president, a range of specific examples are explored in order to highlight the ways in which a pragmatic analysis may provide an insight into presidential language. In many cases, what the president says is not necessarily what the president means.

The Sustainable Laboratory Handbook: Design, Equipment, and Operation

The first comprehensive guide to modern laboratory planning in ten years to address both construction and operating aspects. Many of the 30 authors are affiliated with the European Association for Sustainable Laboratory Technologies (EGNATON), which has also endorsed this ready reference. This expert team covers the entire lifecycle of a laboratory facility, starting with the site layout and the planning of the building, followed by the planning of such areas as housing for laboratory animals, clean rooms and production facilities. The next section of the book deals with the installation of laboratory equipment, including storage and emergency facilities, while the final parts address safety and sustainability standards applicable to laboratories, as well as facility management and optimization during normal laboratory operation. The relevant norms and standards are cited throughout, and examples from recent construction sites are also presented. Hundreds of photographs and drawings, many in full color, provide visual examples of the design and building concepts. As a result, readers will learn how to construct and maintain efficient and long-serving laboratory spaces with a minimum of maintenance costs and a maximum of safety. An invaluable, practical guide for planners, builders and managers of chemical, biological and medical research laboratories of any size.

High-Temperature Superconductors (Springer Series in Materials Science)

The present book aims at describing the phenomenon of superconductivity and high-temperature superconductors discovered by Bednorz and Muller in 1986. The book covers the superconductivity phenomenon, structure of high-Tc superconductors, critical currents, synthesis routes for high Tc materials, superconductivity in cuprates, the proximity effect and SQUIDs, theories of superconductivity and applications of superconductors.

Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of Tokamaks

This book bridges the gap between general plasma physics lectures and the real world problems in MHD stability. In order to support the understanding of concepts and their implication, it refers to real world problems such as toroidal mode coupling or nonlinear evolution in a conceptual and phenomenological approach. Detailed mathematical treatment will involve classical linear stability analysis and an outline of more recent concepts such as the ballooning formalism. The book is based on lectures that the author has given to Master and PhD students in Fusion Plasma Physics. Due its strong link to experimental results in MHD instabilities, the book is also of use to senior researchers in the field, i.e. experimental physicists and engineers in fusion reactor science. The volume is organized in three parts. It starts with an introduction to the MHD equations, a section on toroidal equilibrium (tokamak and stellarator), and on linear stability analysis. Starting from there, the ideal MHD stability of the tokamak configuration will be treated in the second part which is subdivided into current driven and pressure driven MHD. This includes many examples with reference to experimental results for important MHD instabilities such as kinks and their transformation to RWMs, infernal modes, peeling modes, ballooning modes and their relation to ELMs. Finally the coverage is completed by a chapter on resistive stability explaining reconnection and island formation. Again, examples from recent tokamak MHD such as sawteeth, CTMs, NTMs and their relation to disruptions are extensively discussed.

Stability Theory of Dynamical Systems (Classics in Mathematics)

Reprint of classic reference work. Over 400 books have been published in the series Classics in Mathematics, many remain standard references for their subject. All books in this series are reissued in a new, inexpensive softcover edition to make them easily accessible to younger generations of students and researchers. "... The book has many good points: clear organization, historical notes and references at the end of every chapter, and an excellent bibliography. The text is well-written, at a level appropriate for the intended audience, and it represents a very good introduction to the basic theory of dynamical systems."

100 Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know

'If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is.' John von Neumann Mathematics can tell you things about the world that can't be learned in any other way. This hugely informative and wonderfully entertaining little book answers one hundred essential questions about existence. It unravels the knotty, clarifies the conundrums and sheds light into dark corners. From winning the lottery, placing bets at the races and escaping from bears to sports, Shakepeare, Google, game theory, drunks, divorce settlements and dodgy accounting; from chaos to infinity and everything in between, 100 Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know has all the answers!

Reclaiming Value in International Development: The Moral Dimensions of Development Policy and Practice in Poor Countries

International development has complex unintended effects on the realities of equity, rights, governance, and conflict in poor countries. Yet the myriad moral questions and quandaries encountered at every turn by development policymakers and practitioners are seldom thought about or articulated in a rigorous fashion. Instead, development specialists are trained to focus on the technocratic aspects of economic aid delivery and to disregard the moral issues raised by the adverse collateral consequences of aid programs for many people, communities, institutions, and environments in the developing countries. Reclaiming Value in International Development is the first book to bridge the divide between ethics and development from the perspective of a seasoned development practitioner who is also a trained ethicist. Schwenke formally enlarges the concept of development to include its moral dimension, to denote beneficial change that alleviates human misery and environmental degradation in poor countries and reinforces universal ethical norms such as human dignity, essential freedoms, social justice, peace, civic virtue, human flourishing, the common good, gender equality, safety and security, and participation and inclusion. She applies this ethically expanded concept to nine key topics in international development: education, leadership, procurement, food security, conflict, urbanization, gender identity and sexual orientation, deliberative participation, and the measurement of ethical performance. Throughout the book, the author draws on her thirty years of experience as a development practitioner in thirty poor countries around the world to give vivid real-life illustrations of the classic moral dilemmas in development ethics and to show how moral reasoning can clarify and resolve them.

Frommer's San Antonio and Austin (Frommer's Complete Guides)

A complete guide to two of Texas's most diverse and exciting cities Shows visitors how to have a great time in San Antonio, a multicultural city with a rich history (the Alamo) and lots of contemporary attractions (including over forty golf courses) Reveals San Antonio's most memorable experiences--from a stroll along the San Antonio River to a mariachi mass at Mission San Jose--and offers intriguing side trips to the Texas Hill Country Takes visitors to the best of Austin, the "Live Music Capital of the World," with more than 200 music clubs Explains how to make an Austin visit unforgettable, from visiting the state capital and LBJ Library to listening to blues at Antone's, hiking and biking in city parks, and watching the bats at Congress Avenue Bridge

Of Synthetic Finance: Three Essays of Speculative Materialism (Routledge Frontiers of Political Economy)

Synthetic finance revolutionizes materialism such that we can now create wealth in the process of universally distributing it. While financial innovation in global capitalism provided the conditions for the 2008 financial crisis, it has also engineered a set of financial technologies with universal distributive potential. This book explains this possibility and demonstrates how it can be achieved through a rigorous ontological exposition of the radical, nomadic, distributive power of synthetic finance. It also illustrates that Gilles Deleuze is the heterodox political economist who best reveals its profound material capacities. This book articulates an innovative method for the study of finance, fundamentally revaluates political economy as a discipline and practice, and inaugurates a research project from which derivative methodologies and approaches to critical finance can evolve. Of Synthetic Finance actualizes a new kind of heterodox political economy called speculative materialism, and advocates a radical project of speculative materialist financial engineering. Both of these are predicated on the deployment of the latent, nomadic, monstrous capacities of synthetic finance to create and universally distribute risk and cash flow. This book is a must read for anyone interested in critical finance, the financial crisis and the future of political economy.

A Primer of Freudian Psychology

Culled from forty years of writing by the founder of psychoanalysis, A Primer Of Freudian Psychology introduces Freud's theories on the dynamics and development of the human mind. Hall also provides a brief biography of Sigmund Freud and examines how he arrived at his groundbreaking conclusions. In discussing the elements that form personality, the author explains the pioneer thinker's ideas on defense mechanisms, the channeling of instinctual drives, and the role of sex in male and female maturation. Lucid, illuminating, and instructive, this is an important book for all who seek to understand human behavior, in themselves and others.

The Capitalism Papers: Fatal Flaws of an Obsolete System

In the vein of his bestseller, Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television, nationally recognized social critic Jerry Mander researches, discusses, and exposes the momentous and unsolvable environmental and social problems of capitalism. Mander argues that capitalism is no longer a viable system: ?What may have worked in 1900 is calamitous in 2010." Capitalism, utterly dependent on never-ending economic growth, is an impossible absurdity on a finite planet with limited resources. Climate change, together with global food, water, and resource shortages, is only the start. Mander draws attention to capitalism's obsessive need to dominate and undermine democracy, as well as to diminish social and economic equity. Designed to operate free of morality, the system promotes permanent war as a key economic strategy. Worst of all, the problems of capitalism are intrinsic to the form. Many organizations are already anticipating the breakdown of the system and are working to define new hierarchies of democratic values that respect the carrying capacities of the planet.

Meaning, Madness and Political Subjectivity: A study of schizophrenia and culture in Turkey

This book explores the relationship between subjective experience and the cultural, political and historical paradigms in which the individual is embedded. Providing a deep analysis of three compelling case studies of schizophrenia in Turkey, the book considers the ways in which private experience is shaped by collective structures, offering insights into issues surrounding religion, national and ethnic identity and tensions, modernity and tradition, madness, gender and individuality. Chapters draw from cultural psychiatry, medical anthropology, and political theory to produce a model for understanding the inseparability of private experience and collective processes. The book offers those studying political theory a way for conceptualizing the subjective within the political; it offers mental health clinicians and researchers a model for including political and historical realities in their psychological assessments and treatments; and it provides anthropologists with a model for theorizing culture in which psychological experience and political facts become understandable and explainable in terms of, rather than despite each other. Meaning, Madness, and Political Subjectivity provides an original interpretative methodology for analysing culture and psychosis, offering compelling evidence that not only "normal" human experiences, but also extremely "abnormal" experiences such as psychosis are anchored in and shaped by local cultural and political realities.

Ugly Feelings
Ugly Feelings Sented by Christopher

Envy, irritation, paranoia--in contrast to powerful and dynamic negative emotions like anger, these non-cathartic states of feeling are associated with situations in which action is blocked or suspended. In her examination of the cultural forms to which these affects give rise, Sianne Ngai suggests that these minor and more politically ambiguous feelings become all the more suited for diagnosing the character of late modernity. Along with her inquiry into the aesthetics of unprestigious negative affects such as irritation, envy, and disgust, Ngai examines a racialized affect called "animatedness," and a paradoxical synthesis of shock and boredom called "stuplimity." She explores the politically equivocal work of these affective concepts in the cultural contexts where they seem most at stake, from academic feminist debates to the Harlem Renaissance, from late-twentieth-century American poetry to Hollywood film and network television. Through readings of Herman Melville, Nella Larsen, Sigmund Freud, Alfred Hitchcock, Gertrude Stein, Ralph Ellison, John Yau, and Bruce Andrews, among others, Ngai shows how art turns to ugly feelings as a site for interrogating its own suspended agency in the affirmative culture of a market society, where art is tolerated as essentially unthreatening. Ngai mobilizes the aesthetics of ugly feelings to investigate not only ideological and representational dilemmas in literature--with a particular focus on those inflected by gender and race--but also blind spots in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. Her work maps a major intersection of literary studies, media and cultural studies, feminist studies, and aesthetic theory.

Living with Stories: Telling, Re-telling, and Remembering

In essays about communities as varied as Alaskan Native, East Indian, Palestinian, Mexican, and African American, oral historians, folklorists, and anthropologists look at how traditional and historical oral narratives live through re-tellings, gaining meaning and significance in repeated performances, from varying contexts, through cultural and historical knowing, and due to tellers' consciousness of their audiences.

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