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Law's trace: from Hegel to Derrida

Law's Trace argues for the political importance of deconstruction by taking Derrida’s reading of Hegel as its point of departure.

Shakespeare Dwelling : Designs for the Theater of Life

Great halls and hovels, dove-houses and sheepcotes, mountain cells and seaside shelters—these are some of the spaces in which Shakespearean characters gather to dwell, and to test their connections with one another and their worlds. Julia Reinhard Lupton enters Shakespeare’s dwelling places in search of insights into the most fundamental human problems.

The Will of the People: A Modern Myth

Democracies today are in the grip of a myth: the myth of the will of the people. Populist movements use the idea to challenge elected representatives. Politicians, content to invoke the will of the people, fail in their duty to make responsible and accountable decisions. And public contest over political choices is stifled by fears that opposing the will of the people will be perceived as elitist.

The Four Noble Truths
The Four Noble Truths Sented by Rebecca

A guide to some of central teachings of Buddhism based on recent UK lectures by the Dalai Lama. This volume includes: "The Four Noble Truths", a central tenet of Tibetan Buddhism; the need to balance spiritual and material values; and "Compassion, The Basis for Human Happiness".

Shifting Ground: Knowledge and Reality, Transgression and Trustworthiness

This volume of essays by Naomi Scheman brings together her views on epistemic and socio-political issues, views that draw on a critical reading of Wittgenstein as well as on liberatory movements and theories, all in the service of a fundamental reorientation of epistemology.

Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction

Any serious student attempting to better understand the nature, methods and justification of science will value Alex Rosenberg’s updated and substantially revised Third Edition of Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction. Weaving together lucid explanations and clear analyses, the volume is a much-used, thematically oriented introduction to the field.

Collective Epistemology
Collective Epistemology Sented by Christopher

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…” This collection of essays addresses a philosophical problem raised by the first clause of these famous words. Does each signatory of the Declaration of Independence hold these truths individually, do they share some kind of a common attitude, or is there a single subject over and above the heads of its individual members that possesses a belief?“Collective Epistemology” is a name for the view that cognitive attitudes can be attributed to groups in a non-summative sense. The aim of this volume is to examine this claim, and to place it in the wider context of recent epistemological debates about the role of sociality in knowledge acquisition, in virtue and social epistemology, and in philosophy and sociology of science.

The Symbolic Construction of Reality: The Legacy of Ernst Cassirer

In 1933 eminent philosopher Ernst Cassirer (1874–1945) fled Nazi Germany for the United States. His fame in Europe having already been established through a public debate with Martin Heidegger in 1929, Cassirer would go on to become a noteworthy influence on American culture. His most important early writings focused on the symbol and symbolic interaction, exploring how human cultures—from early myth-based ones to our own modern, scientifically oriented time—have used symbols to mediate the basic forms of experience. Following this work, Cassirer extended his insights to encompass a broad spectrum of philosophical themes: from investigations into Western epistemological and scientific traditions to aesthetics and the philosophy of history to anthropology and political philosophy. Reflecting this diversity in Cassirer’s own work, The Symbolic Construction of Reality collects eleven essays by a wide range of contributors from different fields. Each essay analyzes a different aspect of his legacy, reasse

Treatise on Consequences (Medieval Philosophy: Texts and Studies)

The rediscovery of Aristotle in the late twelfth century led to a fresh development of logical theory, culminating in Buridan’s crucial comprehensive treatment in the Treatise on Consequences. Buridan’s novel treatment of the categorical syllogism laid the basis for the study of logic in succeeding centuries.

The Life of Things, the Love of Things (Commonalities)

From prehistoric stone tools, to machines, to computers, things have traveled a long road along with human beings. Changing with the times, places, and methods of their production, emerging from diverse histories, and enveloped in multiple layers of meaning, things embody ideas, emotions, and symbols of which we are often unaware.

New Philosophy for New Media

In New Philosophy for New Media, Mark Hansen defines the image in digital art in terms that go beyond the merely visual. Arguing that the "digital image" encompasses the entire process by which information is made perceivable, he places the body in a privileged position—as the agent that filters information in order to create images. By doing so, he counters prevailing notions of technological transcendence and argues for the indispensability of the human in the digital era.

Heidegger, Žižek and Revolution (Perspectives of Critical Theory and Education)

Why did Martin Heidegger, the giant of continental philosophy, believe in 1933 that Hitler is the future of Europe? And why does Slavoj Žižek, "the most dangerous philosopher in the West", support Heidegger's right wing militancy? Heidegger and Žižek are not only erudite thinkers on human being but also incorrigible revolutionaries who even after the catastrophic failures of their favourite revolutions - the October revolution for Žižek and the National Socialist revolution for Heidegger - want to overcome capitalism; undemocratically, if necessary. The two share a spirited and sophisticated rejection of the liberalist worldview and the social order based on it. The problem is not that liberalism is factually wrong, but rather that it is ethically bad. Both argue for building and educating a new collective based on human finitude and communality. In the tradition of the Enlightenment, Žižek advocates a universalist revolution, whereas Heidegger sees the transformation rooted in particular historical existence, inviting a bewildering array of mutually exclusive criticisms and apologies of his view. The crisis that Heidegger and Žižek want to address is still here, but their unquestioned Europocentrism sets a dark cloud over the whole idea of revolution. hole idea of revolution.

Greek Models of Mind and Self

This lively book offers a wide-ranging study of Greek notions of mind and human selfhood from Homer through Plotinus. A. A. Long anchors his discussion in questions of recurrent and universal interest. What happens to us when we die? How is the mind or soul related to the body? Are we responsible for our own happiness? Can we achieve autonomy? Long asks when and how these questions emerged in ancient Greece, and shows that Greek thinkers’ modeling of the mind gave us metaphors that we still live by, such as the rule of reason or enslavement to passion. He also interrogates the less familiar Greek notion of the intellect’s divinity, and asks what that might mean for us. Because Plato’s dialogues articulate these themes more sharply and influentially than works by any other Greek thinker, Plato receives the most sustained treatment in this account. But at the same time, Long asks whether Plato’s explanation of the mind and human behavior is more convincing for modern readers than that contained in the older Homeric poems. Turning to later ancient philosophy, especially Stoicism, Long concludes with an exploration of Epictetus’s injunction to live life by making correct use of one’s mental impressions. An authoritative treatment of Greek modes of self-understanding, Greek Models of Mind and Self demonstrates how ancient thinkers grappled with what is closest to us and yet still most mysterious―our own essence as singular human selves―and how the study of Greek thought can enlarge and enrich our experience.

Nietzsche and the Becoming of Life

Throughout his writing career Nietzsche advocated the affirmation of earthly life as a way to counteract nihilism and asceticism. This volume takes stock of the complexities and wide-ranging perspectives that Nietzsche brings to bear on the problem of life’s becoming on Earth by engaging various interpretative paradigms reaching from existentialist to Darwinist readings of Nietzsche. In an age in which the biological sciences claim to have unlocked the deepest secrets and codes of life, the essays in this volume propose a more skeptical view. Life is both what is closest and what is furthest from us, because life experiments through us as much as we experiment with it, because life keeps our thinking and our habits always moving, in a state of recurring nomadism. Nietzsche’s philosophy is perhaps the clearest expression of the antinomy contained in the idea of “studying” life and in the Socratic ideal of an “examined” life and remains a deep source of wisdom about living.

Compendium of Icebreakers: Connections for Faultless Training, Volume 2

What experienced trainers know and pay attention to Compendium of Icebreakers, Volume II Connections: 125 Activities for Faultless Training By Lois Hart Are you maximizing every opportunity to connect with participants before, during and after training? This is the key to optimizing the learning experience of every individual and the focus of these 125 tested and proven-effective activities for trainers. The activities are grouped under five critical points of contact trainers have with participants: · Making Contact Before the Workshop includes activities a trainer can do after the participants are identified or selected. · Saying Hello at the Beginning of the Workshop presents activities for introducing the trainer, clarifying objectives and expectations, helping participants get better acquainted and leading warm-up activities · Making Transitions Within the Workshop offers activities for building on what participants have learned from the workshop and one another. · Saying Goodbye at the End of the Workshop focuses on activities that help participants review what has been learned, develop a plan of action, celebrate and receive awards. · Following Up After the Workshop includes strategies for reinforcing what participants have learned and ensuring continuous learning. Based on the principles of accelerated and adult learning, the activities have sound objectives. But they are also fun. Some utilize all the senses. Many get participants on their feet and moving around. Others encourage participants to reveal what they already know and apply what they learn. The activities are formatted for easy use with clearly marked objectives, best occasion to use them, group size, estimated time equipment and supplies needed and materials. Many of the activities have ready-to-use handouts

The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment

Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that punishment and the retributive attitudes are the necessary expression of moral condemnation, his account of these reactions has more in common with restorative justice than traditional retributivism. He argues that the most appropriate way to react to crime is to require the offender to make proportionate amends. His book is a rich and intriguing contribution to the debate over punishment and restorative justice.

The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance

Studies of Simone de Beauvoir have mostly concentrated on her literature, her life, and her famous 1949 work, The Second Sex, and the continued emphasis has been on Beauvoir's views on gender. The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir places her theory of women's "otherness" in the context of a number of contemporary theories on a similar subject. While gender takes its place among these, Professor Deutscher counterbalances its grip on our memory of Beauvoir's ideas by situating it in the context of our relationship to ageing, to generational difference, and to race and cultural difference. By differentiating the many aspects of "otherness," Beauvoir revisited some of the concepts of reciprocity, ambiguity, and ethics for which she is best remembered.

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