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Crashing the Party From the Bernie Sanders Campaign to a Progressive Movement

A leading activist-scholar on what’s next in the Sanders revolution Bernie Sanders shocked the political establishment by winning 13 million votes and a majority of young voters in the 2016 Democratic primary. Since that upset, repeated polls have judged this democratic socialist to be the most popular politician in the United States. What lessons can be drawn from his surprising insurgent campaign? Longtime author and activist Heather Gautney was a Policy Fellow in Sanders’s Washington, DC, office and a volunteer researcher and organizer on his presidential campaign. In reviewing what enabled Sanders to reach out to an unprecedented number with a socialist message—and what stalled his progress—she draws lessons on the prospects and perils of building a progressive movement in the United States. Gautney’s poignant account of the role that race and class played in this election cycle, her anatomy of the conflicting dynamics of movement and electoral ambitions, and her clear-eyed analysis of the Democratic position following Trump’s victory will serve as a useful starting point for many readers newly aware of the limitations of the Democratic Party and the immensity of the challenges ahead.

Rothschild Hanedanlığı
Rothschild Hanedanlığı Sented by Musa

Birçok insanın aklında Rothschild ismi "büyük servet" anlamını çağrıştırsa da bu servetin getirdiği gücü kavrayan çok az kişi bulunur. Rothschildler servetlerini rahat yaşamak için değil bütün ulusların güç odaklarını yönetmek böylece günümüze kadar ulusları kontrol etmek için kullanmışlardır.

The Great Tapestry of Scotland: The Making of a Masterpiece

The brainchild of bestselling author Alexander McCall Smith, historian Alistair Moffat and artist Andrew Crummy, the Great Tapestry of Scotland is an outstanding celebration of thousands of years of Scottish history and achievement, from the end of the last Ice Age to Dolly the Sheep. Like the Bayeux tapestry, the Great Tapestry of Scotland has been created on embroidered cloth, and is annotated in English, Gaelic, Scots and Latin. This book, with a foreword by Alexander McCall Smith, tells the story of this unique undertaking - one of the biggest community arts projects ever to take place in Scotland - and reproduces in full colour a selection of the panels from the completed tapestry, together with descriptive and explanatory material. It is published to coincide with the completion of the tapestry in August 2013. See www.scotlandstapestry.com for further details.

Mothers, Daughters, and Body Image: Learning to Love Ourselves as We Are

When women are told that what is important about us is how we look, it becomes increasingly difficult for us to feel comfortable with our appearance and how we feel about our bodies. We are told, over and over-if we just lost weight, fit into those old jeans, or into a new smaller pair-we will be happier and feel better about ourselves. The truth is, so many women despise their appearance, weight, and shape, that experts who study women's body image now consider this feeling to be normal.

Mariah Carey
Mariah Carey Sented by Musa

A Cinderella story starring the bestselling female musical artist of the millennium. Mariah Carey grew up in a broken home, poor and with no friends. Singing was her salvation. One day, at a music industry party, another musician slips executive Tommy Mottola a demo tape of Mariah. In the limo on his way home Mottola is bored, so he listens to the tape. Mariah's voice is like liquid gold. He goes back to look for her. But just like in the Cinderella story, she has slipped away.

Love and Death in the Great War

Americans today harbor no strong or consistent collective memory of the First World War. Ask why the country fought or what they accomplished, and 'democracy' is the most likely if vague response. The circulation of confusing or lofty rationales for intervention began as soon as President Woodrow Wilson secured a war declaration in April 1917. Yet amid those shifting justifications, Love and Death in the Great War argues, was a more durable and resonant one: Americans would fight for home and family. Officials in the military and government, grasping this crucial reality, invested the war with personal meaning, as did popular culture. 'Make your mother proud of you/And the Old Red White and Blue' went George Cohan's famous tune 'Over There.' Federal officials and their allies in public culture, in short, told the war story as a love story.

Joey Jacobson's War : A Jewish Canadian Airman in the Second World War

In the spring of 1940 Canada sent hundreds of highly trained volunteers to serve in Britain's Royal Air Force as it began a concerted bombing campaign against Germany. Nearly half of them were killed or captured within a year. This is the story of one of those airmen, as told through his own letters and diaries as well as those of his family and friends.

James I (Penguin Monarchs): The Phoenix King

James's reign marked one of the very rare major breaks in England's monarchy. Already James VI of Scotland and a highly experienced ruler who had established his authority over the Scottish Kirk, he marched south on Elizabeth I's death to become James I of England and Ireland, uniting the British Isles for the first time and founding the Stuart dynasty which would, with several lurches, reign for over a century. Indeed his descendant still occupies the throne.

Go Ask Ali: Half-Baked Advice (and Free Lemonade)

New York Times bestselling author Ali Wentworth offers her hilarious and unique advice on surviving the absurdity of modern life in her third collection of laugh-out-loud comic vignettes.

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn: Modern American Revolutionary (Lives of American Women)

In 1906, fifteen-year old Elizabeth Gurley Flynn mounted a soapbox in Times Square to denounce capitalism and proclaim a new era for women's freedom. Quickly recognized as an outstanding public speaker and formidable organizer, she devoted her life to creating a socialist America, "free from poverty, exploitation, greed and injustice."

Comrade Haldane Is Too Busy to Go on Holiday: The Genius Who Spied for Stalin

John Burdon Sanderson Haldane F.R.S. (1892-1964) was one of the leading scientists of the twentieth century, renowned for helping, through statistical wizardry, to reconcile Darwin's theory of natural selection with Mendel's discovery of genes. The product of a distinguished family of scientists and public figures, "JBS" trained and influenced a swathe of students and colleagues at Oxford, Cambridge, and University College London, many of whom, such as the evolutionary theorist John Maynard Smith, went on to distinction in their own right.

Cast in Deathless Bronze : Andrew Rowan, the Spanish-American War, and the Origins of American Empire

In 1898, when war with Spain seemed inevitable, Andrew Summers Rowan, an American army lieutenant from West Virginia, was sent on a secret mission to Cuba. He was to meet with General Calixto Garcia, a leader of the Cuban rebels, in order to gather information for a U.S. invasion. Months later, after the war was fought and won, a flamboyant entrepreneur named Elbert Hubbard wrote an account of Rowan's mission titled "A Message to Garcia." It sold millions of copies, and Rowan became the equivalent of a modern-day rock star. His fame resulted in hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles, radio shows, and two movies. Even today he is held up as an exemplar of bravery and loyalty. The problem is that nothing Hubbard wrote about Rowan was true.

BloodLine: You Spend Enough Time in Hell and You Get the Feeling You Belong

Torn from an idyllic life with a loving, extended family in 1960's Alabama, young Johnny Turnipseed found himself in Minneapolis, Minnesota with a father he no longer recognized and empty cupboards. A.C. Turnipseed's alcoholism and womanizing started a chain reaction of poverty, violence, addiction and despair that nearly destroyed three generations.

Beneath a Ruthless Sun: A True Story of Violence, Race, and Justice

"Compelling, insightful and important, Beneath a Ruthless Sun exposes the corruption of racial bigotry and animus that shadows a community, a state and a nation. A fascinating examination of an injustice story all too familiar and still largely ignored, an engaging and essential read." CBryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy

An Angel Directs the Storm: Apocalyptic Religion and American Empire

This passionate and powerfully argued book takes its title from President Bush's inaugural speech, when he quoted 18C statesman John Page, who enquired if it were not 'an angel who directed the storm' within which America came into being. Michael Northcott appraises two visions of religious freedom: the apocalyptic vision of George W. Bush and the Christian conservatives who back his policies, particularly in relation to Iraq and the so-called war on terror; and the peaceable vision of a Christian majority elsewhere who resist what they view as American neo-imperialism with an overlay of Christian apocalyptic rhetoric. Northcott suggests that Americans urgently need to recover a Christian critique of 'Empire' if their religion is to avoid the charge of idolatry.

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