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Precarious Labour and Informal Economy Work, Anarchy, and Society in an Indian Village

An empirical account of one of India’s largest indigenous populations, this book tells the story of the Gonds―who currently face displacement and governmental control of the region’s forests, which has crippled their economy. Rather than protesting and calling for state intervention, the Gonds have turned toward an informal economy: they not only engage with flexible forms of work, but also bargain for higher wages and experience agency and autonomy. Smita Yadav conceives of this withdrawal from the state in favour of precarious forms of work as an expression of anarchy by this marginalized population. Even as she provides rich detail of the Gonds’ unusual working lives, which integrate work, labour, and debt practices with ideologies of family and society, Yadav illustrates the strength required to maintain dignity when a welfare state has failed.

The Long Space Age The Economic Origins of Space Exploration From Colonial America to the Cold War

An economic historian argues that privately funded space exploration is not a new development, but a trend beginning with the astronomical observatories of the nineteenth century Over the last half-century there has been a rapid expansion in commerce off the surface of our planet. Nations and corporations have placed hundreds of satellites that provide billions of dollars’ worth of communications, scientific, global positioning, and commercial services, while construction has been completed on humanity’s ninth and largest space station. On the planet itself, government agencies, corporations, and individuals plan for the expansion of economic development to the lunar surface, asteroids, and Mars. The future of space exploration seems likely to include a mix of large government funded missions as well as independent private-sector missions. The Long Space Age examines the economic history of American space exploration and spaceflight, from early astronomical observatories to the International Space Station, and argues that the contemporary rise of private-sector efforts is the re-emergence of a long-run trend not a new phenomenon.

The Half-Life of Deindustrialization

Starting in the late 1970s, tens of thousands of American industrial workers lost jobs in factories and mines. Deindustrialization had dramatic effects on those workers and their communities, but its longterm effects continue to ripple through working-class culture. Economic restructuring changed the experience of work, disrupted people’s sense of self, reshaped local landscapes, and redefined community identities and expectations. Through it all, working-class writers have told stories that reflect the importance of memory and the struggle to imagine a different future. These stories make clear that the social costs of deindustrialization affect not only those who lost their jobs but also their children, their communities, and American culture. Through analysis of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, film, and drama, The Half-Life of Deindustrialization shows why people and communities cannot simply “get over” the losses of economic restructuring. The past provides inspiration and strength for working-class people, even as the contrast between past and present highlights what has been lost in the service economy. The memory of productive labor and stable, proud working-class communities shapes how people respond to contemporary economic, social, and political issues. These stories can help us understand the resentment, frustration, pride, and persistence of the American working class.

Nolo's Guide to Social Security Disability, Ninth Edition

Qualify for Social Security disability benefits, quickly and easily This comprehensive and compassionate book covers both SSDI and SSI, shows you how to prove a disability, and explains how your age, education, and work experience affect your chances. Parents will find special information about benefits available to children with a disability. Learn how to: find the disability criteria for your medical condition prove the severity of your disability appeal if you’re denied benefits work part time while keeping your benefits prepare for a Continuing Disability Review and more. Plus, this book is packed with filled-in samples of all the forms you’ll need, including the SSDI and SSI disability applications. This edition covers recent major changes, including: updated disability listings for over 65 medical conditions new rules concerning hearings and evidence, and changes in how Social Security considers evidence from treating doctors and other medical providers.

Disasters in the United States Frequency, Costs, and Compensatio

Disasters are increasing in frequency throughout the world. In 2015 in the United States, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recorded a total of 70 natural disasters with 43 of those receiving major disaster declarations. In contrast, 13 major disasters were declared in 1953. As a result, the costs and other complex issues associated with mitigation efforts of disasters is drawing increased attention from economists, insurers, and policymakers. Brusentsev and Vroman address six key disaster-related questions: 1. What do we know about disasters in the United States? 2. Has there been an increase in their frequency? 3. What are the financial costs associated with disasters? 4. What compensation, including social assistance, is available to survivors? 5. Where is each type of disaster likely to occur? 6. How can disasters be mitigated? Their statistical analysis shows that declarations of disasters has increased at a rate much faster that the rate of population growth, that disaster risks of climate change tend to be concentrated in urban areas, and that there is a statistically significant association between disasters and the increase in global temperature.

Building a StoryBran
Building a StoryBran Sented by Michael

New York Times bestselling author Donald Miller uses the seven universal elements of powerful stories to teach readers how to dramatically improve how they connect with customers and grow their businesses. Donald Miller’s StoryBrand process is a proven solution to the struggle business leaders face when talking about their businesses. This revolutionary method for connecting with customers provides readers with the ultimate competitive advantage, revealing the secret for helping their customers understand the compelling benefits of using their products, ideas, or services. Building a StoryBrand does this by teaching readers the seven universal story points all humans respond to; the real reason customers make purchases; how to simplify a brand message so people understand it; and how to create the most effective messaging for websites, brochures, and social media. Whether you are the marketing director of a multibillion dollar company, the owner of a small business, a politician running for office, or the lead singer of a rock band, Building a StoryBrand will forever transform the way you talk about who you are, what you do, and the unique value you bring to your customers.

Marketing Your Startup The Inc. Guide to Getting Customers, Gaining Traction, and Growing Your Business

Let Inc. catapult your company to success. To put a business on the map, nothing beats great marketing. No matter how original your idea or ambitious your dreams, the company will stall without a plan to spread the word, build momentum, and drive sales. But how many entrepreneurs excel at marketing? If you are like most, you are focused on building your product or service...and don't know how to execute a marketing strategy or measure the results. No one is better positioned than Inc. to help you get up to speed fast. For years, Inc. has covered the innovative marketing used by thousands of tiny startups that turned into household names. Now, Marketing Your Startup shares these compelling stories and spotlights strategies for igniting growth, including how: Dollar Shave Club mastered the inexpensive viral video - and rocketed to success Casper combined content marketing, creative branding, and old-fashioned subway ads to convince consumers to buy mattresses a whole new way SoulCycle's obsessive fixation on their brand fueled their rise from spin studio to cultlike fitness sensation Through firsthand insights from founders and helpful how-to guidelines, you'll learn to define your brand, market position, and customers, then unleash the right mix of tactics through the right channels: social media, email and direct mail, content marketing, SEO, media ads, events, guerilla marketing, influencers, cause marketing, and more. Whether you've got a robust budget or you're bootstrapping your way to the top, Marketing Your Startup gives you the tools to launch an empire.

Disaster_Policy and Its Practice in the United States

Emergency Management, as an industry and practice, is a relatively new field in the United States and abroad. As the threat of attack gradually declined in the second half of the 20th century, our modern system of emergency management began to take shape in the 1970s. With the passage of the Disaster Relief Act in 1974, the federal government introduced the first standardized process for granting financial assistance after a disaster. Around the same time, the National Governors Association released a report on the practice of emergency management, noting that there were four main phases: Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery. As the Post-War United States turned its attention to building increasingly complicated societal systems dependent on technology, vulnerability to disasters of every kind also increased. New policies and practices were required to manage the impacts of disaster on modern society. Following the terrorist attach on September 11, 2001 and Hurricane Katrina in 2006, the US government has placed more requirements on local, state and federal agencies to be better prepared and better coordinated. Emergency management policy reflects the reactionary approach typical of the industry. A disaster occurs; a system or process fails leading lawmakers to ask what might be done different next time; a lesson is learned; policy is written. But does it work? Were any mandates more successful than others? To what extent are these laws followed or enforced? Practitioners Guide to US Disaster Policy will explore each explores each major piece of legislation and their implications. Unlike many other major industries, emergency management lacks an authoritative and unified voice for how federal lawmakers will impact the industry. As society grows more complex, populous, and dependent on technology, these are questions, which must be explored and revisited on a regular basis. Recommendations for short- and long-term policy needs are made, as well as new approaches for managing disasters in the United States

Understanding Statistics An Introduction

The modern world is brimming with statistical information—information relevant to our personal health and safety, the weather, or the robustness of the national or global economy, to name just a few examples. But don’t statistics lie? Well, no—people lie, and sometimes they use statistical language to do it. Knowing when you’re being hoodwinked requires a degree of statistical literacy, but most people don’t learn how to interpret statistical claims unless they take a formal course that trains them in the mathematical techniques of statistical analysis. This book won’t turn you into a statistician—that would require a much longer and more technical discussion—but it will give you the tools to understand statistical claims and avoid common pitfalls associated with translating statistical information from the language of mathematics to plain English.

The Imperatives of Sustainable Development Needs, Justice, Limits

Thirty years ago, the UN report Our Common Future placed sustainable development firmly on the international agenda. The Imperatives of Sustainable Development takes the ethical foundations of Our Common Future and builds a model that emphasizes three equally important moral imperatives – satisfying human needs, ensuring social justice, and respecting environmental limits. This model suggests sustainability themes and assigns thresholds to them, thereby defining the space within which sustainable development can be achieved. The authors accept that there is no single pathway to the sustainable development space. Different countries face different challenges and must follow different pathways. This perspective is applied to all countries to determine whether the thresholds of the sustainability themes selected have been met, now and in the past. The authors build on the extensive literature on needs, equity, justice, environmental science, ecology, and economics, and show how the three moral imperatives can guide policymaking. The Imperatives of Sustainable Development synthesizes past reasoning, summarizes the present debate, and provides a clear direction for future thinking. This book will be essential reading for everyone interested in the future of sustainable development and in the complex environmental and social issues involved.

The Human Advantage The Future of American Work in an Age of Smart Machines

Bestselling author and economist Jay W. Richards makes the definitive case for how the free market and individual responsibility can save the American Dream in an age of automation and mass disruption. For two and a half centuries, America has been held together by the belief that if you work hard and conduct yourself responsibly in this country, you will be able to prosper and leave a better life for your children. But over the past decade, that idea has come into crisis. A recession, the mass outsourcing of stable jobs, and a coming wave of automation that will replace millions of blue- and white-collar jobs alike have left many people worried that the game is rigged and that our best days are behind us. In this story-driven manifesto on the future of American work, Jay Richards argues that such thinking is counterproductive--making us more fragile, more dependent, and less equipped to succeed in a rapidly changing economy. If we're going to survive, we need a new model for how ordinary people can thrive in this age of mass disruption. Richards pulls back the curtain on what's really happening in our economy, dispatching myths about capitalism, greed, and upward mobility. And he tells the stories of how real individuals have begun to rebuild a culture of virtue, capitalizing on the skills that are most uniquely human: creativity, resilience, and empathy for the needs of others. Destined to take its place alongside classics like Economics in One Lesson, The Human Advantage is the essential book for understanding the future of American work, and how each of us can make this era of staggering change work on our behalf.

The Theory of Monopoly Capitalism, 2nd Edition

In 1966, Paul Baran and Paul Sweezy published Monopoly Capital, a monumental work of economic theory and social criticism that sought to reveal the basic nature of the capitalism of their time. Their theory, and its continuing elaboration by Sweezy, Harry Magdoff, and others in Monthly Review magazine, infl uenced generations of radical and heterodox economists. They recognized that Marx’s work was unfi nished and itself historically conditioned, and that any attempt to understand capitalism as an evolving phenomenon needed to take changing conditions into account. Having observed the rise of giant monopolistic (or oligopolistic) fi rms in the twentieth century, they put monopoly capital at the center of their analysis, arguing that the rising surplus such fi rms accumulated—as a result of their pricing power, massive sales efforts, and other factors—could not be profi tably invested back into the economy. Absent any “epoch making innovations” like the automobile or vast new increases in military spending, the result was a general trend toward economic stagnation—a condition that persists, and is increasingly apparent, to this day. Their analysis was also extended to issues of imperialism, or “accumulation on a world scale,” overlapping with the path-breaking work of Samir Amin in particular. John Bellamy Foster is a leading exponent of this theoretical perspective today, continuing in the tradition of Baran and Sweezy’s Monopoly Capital. This new edition of his essential work, The Theory of Monopoly Capitalism, is a clear and accessible explication of this outlook, brought up to the present, and incorporating an analysis of recently discovered “lost” chapters from Monopoly Capital and correspondence between Baran and Sweezy. It also discusses Magdoff and Sweezy’s analysis of the fi nancialization of the economy in the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, leading up to the Great Financial Crisis of the opening decade of this century. Foster presents and develops the main arguments of monopoly capital theory, examining its key exponents, and addressing its critics in a way that is thoughtful but rigorous, suspicious of dogma but adamant that the deep-seated problems of today’s monopoly-fi nance capitalism can only truly be solved in the process of overcoming the system itself.

Handbook of Research on Advanced Data Mining Techniques and Applications for Business Intelligence

The development of business intelligence has enhanced the visualization of data to inform and facilitate business management and strategizing. By implementing effective data-driven techniques, this allows for advance reporting tools to cater to company-specific issues and challenges. The Handbook of Research on Advanced Data Mining Techniques and Applications for Business Intelligence is a key resource on the latest advancements in business applications and the use of mining software solutions to achieve optimal decision-making and risk management results. Highlighting innovative studies on data warehousing, business activity monitoring, and text mining, this publication is an ideal reference source for research scholars, management faculty, and practitioners.

The Ascendancy of Finance
The Ascendancy of Finance Sented by Michael

The global financial crisis of 2008 ushered in a system of informal decision-making in the grey zone between economics and politics. Legitimized by a rhetoric of emergency, ad hoc bodies have usurped democratically elected governments. In line with the neoliberal credo, the recent crisis has been used to realize the politically impossible and to re-align executive power with the interests of the finance industry. In this important book, Joseph Vogl offers a much longer perspective on these developments, showing how the dynamics of modern finance capitalism have always rested on a complex and constantly evolving relationship between private creditors and the state. Combining historical and theoretical analysis, Vogl argues that over the last three centuries, finance has become a "fourth estate," marked by the systematic interconnection of treasury and finance, of political and private economic interests. Against this historical background, Vogl explores the latest phase in the financialization of government, namely the dramatic transfer of power from states to markets in the latter half of the 20th century. From the liberalization of credit and capital markets to the privatization of social security, he shows how policy has actively enabled a restructuring of the economy around the financial sector. Political systems are "imprisoned" by the regime of finance, while the corporate model suffuses society, enclosing populations in the production of financial capital. The Ascendancy of Finance provides valuable and unsettling insight into the genesis of modern power and where it truly resides.

Neoliberalism and Urban Development in Latin America The Case of Santiago

In the 1970s and following on from the deposition of Salvador Allende, the Chilean dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet installed a radical political and economic system by force which lent heavy privilege to free market capitalism, reduced the power of the state to its minimum and actively suppressed civil society. Chicago economist Milton Friedman was heavily involved in developing this model, and it would be hard to think of a clearer case where ideology has shaped a country over such a long period. That ideology is still very much with us today and has come to be defined as neoliberalism. This book charts the process as it developed in the Chilean capital Santiago and involves a series of case studies and reflections on the city as a neoliberal construct. The variegated, technocratic and post-authoritarian aspects of the neoliberal turn in Chile serve as a cultural and political milieu. Through the work of urban scholars, architects, activists and artists, a cacophony of voices assemble to illustrate the existing neoliberal urbanism of Santiago and its irreducible tension between polis and civitas in the specific context of omnipresent neoliberalism. Chapters explore multiple aspects of the neoliberal delirium of Santiago: observing the antagonists of this scheme; reviewing the insurgent emergence of alternative and contested practices; and suggesting ways forward in a potential post-neoliberal city. Refusing an essentialist call, Neoliberalism and Urban Development in Latin America offers an alternative understanding of the urban conditions of Santiago. It will be essential reading to students of urban development, neoliberalism and urban theory, and well as architects, urban planners, geographers, anthropologists, economists, philosophers and sociologists.

Regulatory Hacking A Playbook for Startups

Every startup wants to change the world. But the ones who truly make an impact know something the others don't: how to make government and regulation work for them. As startups use technology to shape the way we live, work, and learn, they're taking on challenges in sectors like healthcare, infrastructure, and education, where failure is far more consequential than a humorous chat with Siri or the wrong package on your doorstep. These startups inevitably have to face governments responsible for protecting citizens through regulation. Love it or hate it, we're entering the next era of the digital revolution: the Regulatory Era. The big winners in this era--in terms of both impact and financial return--will need skills they won't teach you in business school or most startup incubators: how to scale a business in an industry deeply intertwined with government. Here, for the first time, is the playbook on how to win the regulatory era. "Regulatory hacking" doesn't mean "cutting through red tape"; it's really about finding a creative, strategic approach to navigating complex markets. Evan Burfield is the cofounder of 1776, a Washington, DC-based venture capital firm and incubator specializing in regulated industries. Burfield has coached startups on how to understand, adapt to, and influence government regulation. Now, in Regulatory Hacking, he draws on that expertise and real startup success stories to show you how to do the same. For instance, you'll learn how... * AirBnB rallied a grassroots movement to vote No on San Francisco's Prop F, which would have restricted its business in the city. * HopSkipDrive overcame safety concerns about its kids' ridesharing service by working with state government to build trust into its platform. * 23andMe survived the FDA's order to stop selling its genetic testing kits by building trusted relationships with scientists who could influence the federal regulatory community. Through fascinating case studies and interviews with startup founders, Burfield shows you how to build a compelling narrative for your startup, use it to build a grassroots movement to impact regulation, and develop influence to overcome entrenched relationships between incumbents and governments. These are just some of the tools in the book that you'll need to win the next frontier of innovation.

Environmental Policy and the Pursuit of Sustainability

It is increasingly apparent that human activities are not suitable for sustaining a healthy global environment. From energy development to resource extraction to use of land and water, humans are having a devastating effect on the earth’s ability to sustain human societies and quality lives. Many approaches to changing the negative environmental consequences of human activities focus on one of two options, emphasizing either technological fixes or individual behavior change to reduce environmental harms through sustainable consumption habits. This book takes a different approach, focusing on the role of environmental policy in shaping the possibilities for and creating hindrances to pursuing more sustainable use of environmental resources. This unique compilation examines environmental policy through empirical case studies, demonstrating through each particular example how environmental policies are formed, how they operate, what they do in terms of shaping behaviors and future trajectories, and how they intersect with other social dynamics such as politics, power, social norms, and social organization. By providing case studies from both the United States and Mexico, this book provides a cross-national perspective on current environmental policies and their role in creating and limiting sustainable human futures. Organized around four key parts – Water; Land; Health and Wellbeing; and Resilience – and with a central theme of environmental justice and equity, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars of environmental policy and sustainability.

Disaster Policy and Its Practice in the United States

Emergency Management, as an industry and practice, is a relatively new field in the United States and abroad. As the threat of attack gradually declined in the second half of the 20th century, our modern system of emergency management began to take shape in the 1970s. With the passage of the Disaster Relief Act in 1974, the federal government introduced the first standardized process for granting financial assistance after a disaster. Around the same time, the National Governors Association released a report on the practice of emergency management, noting that there were four main phases: Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery. As the Post-War United States turned its attention to building increasingly complicated societal systems dependent on technology, vulnerability to disasters of every kind also increased. New policies and practices were required to manage the impacts of disaster on modern society. Following the terrorist attach on September 11, 2001 and Hurricane Katrina in 2006, the US government has placed more requirements on local, state and federal agencies to be better prepared and better coordinated. Emergency management policy reflects the reactionary approach typical of the industry. A disaster occurs; a system or process fails leading lawmakers to ask what might be done different next time; a lesson is learned; policy is written. But does it work? Were any mandates more successful than others? To what extent are these laws followed or enforced? Practitioners Guide to US Disaster Policy will explore each explores each major piece of legislation and their implications. Unlike many other major industries, emergency management lacks an authoritative and unified voice for how federal lawmakers will impact the industry. As society grows more complex, populous, and dependent on technology, these are questions, which must be explored and revisited on a regular basis. Recommendations for short- and long-term policy needs are made, as well as new approaches for managing disasters in the United States

The Money Navigator The Essential Guide to Living Your Ideal Financial Life

Navigate Your Way to Financial Freedom The road to financial well-being is complex. En route, you face an overwhelming variety of complicated choices—from deciding which job to take to determining how best to spend or save—that can impact your financial life in ways that are often difficult to predict. Author Paul Bennett knows there is no decision that is not connected to your financial well-being. With over twenty-five years of experience, as a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional he also knows that navigating those decisions doesn’t have to be so hard. The Money Navigator examines: • Key insights into human economic behavior • Reasons why investors make poor decisions • Why financial and insurance products are so misunderstood • How a Money Navigator—a full-scale CFP®—can help you invest well and manage your financial life with ease. ?With fresh insights and real-life examples backed up by in-depth research, each chapter of The Money Navigator offers you practical takeaways for you particular situation, whether you find yourself on the cusp of retirement, are already retired, or are facing a life transition. Bennett’s expert navigation and advice propels you toward the life you always imagined and equips you with the tools to attain your goals.

Muslims, Money, and Democracy in Turkey Reluctant Capitalists

This book contextualizes the rise of a neo-Islamic Turkish bourgeoisie class with a particular reference to the relationship between Islam and Capitalism, and makes the argument for their ultimate compatibility . Additionally, the claim is made that the formation of this new socio-economic class has been detrimental to Turkey's efforts to consolidate its democracy. In order to analyze these processes, an Islamic-oriented young business group, Economic Entrepreneurship and Business Ethic Association (IGIAD), was taken as a case study. Drawing on fieldwork in examining IGIAD’S mission, vision, and activities, the book argues that such associations were born as a response to increasing tension between capitalism and Islam, with the aim of creating a ‘moral’ economy within global capitalism.

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