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My Fair Wedding Finding Your Vision . . . Through His Revisions!

Fans of WE tv’s My Fair Wedding have watched celebrity wedding planner David Tutera miraculously create celebrations that are each as unique as, and perfectly suited to, the bride herself—and in keeping with the theme or mood that is her vision of her special day. From a chic city loft feel to retro Hollywood glamour, from exotic destinations to sleek winter landscapes, David has translated the oftentimes scattered, misguided, or underwhelming visions of his brides into brilliant and artistic expressions of love, passion, and personality. But only a handful of lucky brides-to-be get the wedding makeover of their dreams as part of the WE tv hit reality show. Now, you can plan the wedding you want and deserve with this wonderful companion volume. It not only features the stories of the most memorable My Fair Wedding brides from three fabulous seasons but gives you the “Tutera touch” as well as expert tools for creating an affair that you, your groom, and your family and friends will cherish forever. Not your average wedding guide, My Fair Wedding is grounded in David’s philosophy that regardless of budget, every bride can have a fantasy wedding as long as the right choices go into the planning—and every detail counts. Here you will find: • insightful and indispensable “What Would David Do?” sidebars • self-quizzes that help you zero in on your preferences and tastes for a truly personalized wedding • real-life etiquette and time-tested manners that add class to every occasion • advice and inspiration for choosing everything from gowns, shoes, hair, and makeup to invitations, photographers, music, lighting, centerpieces, favors, thank-you notes, and so much more • helpful pointers for logistical planning— transportation, outdoor ceremonies, timelines, and other factors for keeping things stress free. Most important, David Tutera helps every bride-to-be to reach deeper, aspire higher, become transformed from within, and radiate a special glow and renewed self-confidence that lasts long beyond her wedding day.

In a Single Garment of Destiny

An unprecedented and timely collection that captures the global vision of Dr. King—in his own words Too many people continue to think of Martin Luther King, Jr., only as “a Southern civil rights leader” or “an American Gandhi,” thus ignoring his impact on poor and oppressed people around the world. "In a Single Garment of Destiny" is the first book to treat King's positions on global liberation struggles through the prism of his own words and activities. From the pages of this extraordinary collection, Dr. King emerges not only as an advocate for global human rights but also as a towering figure who collaborated with Eleanor Roosevelt, Albert J. Luthuli, Thich Nhat Hanh, and other national and international figures in addressing a multitude of issues we still struggle with today: from racism, poverty, and war to religious bigotry and intolerance. Introduced and edited by distinguished King scholar Lewis Baldwin, this volume breaks new ground in our understanding of King.

A Certain Loneliness A Memoir (American Lives)

After contracting polio as a child, Sandra Gail Lambert progressed from braces and crutches to a manual wheelchair to a power wheelchair—but loneliness has remained a constant, from the wild claustrophobia of a child in body casts to just yesterday, trapped at home, gasping from pain. A Certain Loneliness is a meditative and engaging memoir-in-essays that explores the intersection of disability, queerness, and female desire with frankness and humor. Lambert presents the adventures of flourishing within a world of uncertain tomorrows: kayaking alone through swamps with alligators; negotiating planes, trains, and ski lifts; scoring free drugs from dangerous men; getting trapped in a too-deep snow drift without crutches. A Certain

Harry's Last Stand How the World My Generation Built Is Falling Down, and What We Can Do to Save It

Ninety-one-year old Harry Leslie Smith became an internet sensation in late 2013 when his article for the Guardian website—"This year, I will wear a poppy for the last time"—was shared almost sixty thousand times on Facebook, attracting a huge amount of media attention. Born in 1923 in the north of England and a longtime resident of Toronto, Ontario, Leslie Smith witnessed firsthand the horrors of the 1930s depression and the rebuilding of the world out of the rubble of the Second World War. He now fears that history is repeating, and with a voice as angry as it is lyrical, Harry shows us younger generations what the world looks like to him—and why we shouldn't take it lying down. Harry Leslie Smith is a second world war RAF veteran and, at ninety-one, an activist for the poor and for the preservation of social democracy. He lives outside Toronto, Ontario.

Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry

A revealing portrait of one of the most gifted and charismatic, yet least understood, Black artists and intellectuals of the twentieth century. Lorraine Hansberry, who died at thirty-four, was by all accounts a force of nature. Although best-known for her work A Raisin in the Sun, her short life was full of extraordinary experiences and achievements, and she had an unflinching commitment to social justice, which brought her under FBI surveillance when she was barely in her twenties. While her close friends and contemporaries, like James Baldwin and Nina Simone, have been rightly celebrated, her story has been diminished and relegated to one work—until now. In 2018, Hansberry will get the recognition she deserves with the PBS American Masters documentary “Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart” and Imani Perry’s multi-dimensional, illuminating biography, Looking for Lorraine. After the success of A Raisin in the Sun, Hansberry used her prominence in myriad ways: challenging President Kennedy and his brother to take bolder stances on Civil Rights, supporting African anti-colonial leaders, and confronting the romantic racism of the Beat poets and Village hipsters. Though she married a man, she identified as lesbian and, risking censure and the prospect of being outed, joined one of the nation’s first lesbian organizations. Hansberry associated with many activists, writers, and musicians, including Malcolm X, Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, Paul Robeson, W.E.B. Du Bois, among others. Looking for Lorraine is a powerful insight into Hansberry’s extraordinary life—a life that was tragically cut far too short.

Night Moves
Night Moves Sented by Shon

Written in taut, mesmerizing, often hilarious scenes, Night Moves captures the fierce friendships and small moments that form us all. Drawing on her personal journals from the aughts, Jessica Hopper chronicles her time as a DJ, living in decrepit punk houses, biking to bad loft parties with her friends, exploring Chicago deep into the night. And, along the way, she creates an homage to vibrant corners of the city that have been muted by sleek development. A book birthed in the amber glow of Chicago streetlamps, Night Moves is about a transformative moment of cultural history—and how a raw, rebellious writer found her voice.

The Pocket Meister Eckhart (Shambhala Pocket Library)

An introduction to the writing and preaching of the greatest medieval European mystic. Meister Eckhart (1260–1327), a German Dominican whose preaching was immensely popular in his own time, was one of the greatest medieval European mystics, and his writings helped build the foundation of the Western mystical tradition. This important introduction to his writing and preaching contains rich selections from his sermons, treatises, and sayings, as well as Table Talk, the records of his informal advice to his spiritual children. This book was previously published under the title Meister Eckhart, from Whom God Hid Nothing: Sermons, Writings, and Sayings. The Shambhala Pocket Library is a collection of short, portable teachings from notable figures across religious traditions and classic texts. The covers in this series are rendered by Colorado artist Robert Spellman. The books in this collection distill the wisdom and heart of the work Shambhala Publications has published over 50 years into a compact format that is collectible, reader-friendly, and applicable to everyday life.

The Egg & The Family: IVF - The Early Years

This short memoir mixes science with human interest. It charts the author's journey working at the forefront of In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF), test tube baby research. It recounts the challenges that went into establishing IVF in the wake of Steptoe and Edwards and provides a cautionary tale of how necessary it is to pay attention to what's going on in your own family. There are no other published books that detail the development of IVF in the UK from the perspective of someone who was at the cutting edge, but it is told from a very human and personal view point to appeal to a wide variety of readers. The author started as a homeless teenager from Grimsby and later became one of the founding fathers of IVF. Throughout the 1980s and 90s and for years after that, he played a key part in its scientific progress. The dedication to bring children into the lives of thousands of infertile families, came at a cost of losing his own family. Dr Steve Green PhD is a Clinical Embryologist and is regarded today as one of the founding fathers of Modern Embryology. In 1981 he began working on the techniques that would become routine in treating infertility and was the embryologist responsible for the first test tube baby (IVF) twins and triplets in the UK in 1982 and 1984 respectively. His work on simultaneous sperm and egg transfer directly into the uterus with the team at the Royal Free Hospital in London, resulted in the first babies in the world to be born from this pioneering technique in 1982. The work has since been referred to many times as a significant milestone in IVF history and paved the way for alternative thinking. In 1995 while at the nurture unit, Dr Green was part of the team that achieved the first pregnancy in the world after treating a couple with ICSI using the immature sperm. Dr Green now lives in County Antrim, Northern Ireland and has published over 50 academic papers and is still very active in the field where his interests are focussed on egg vitrification; a special technique of freezing and time-lapse imaging of embryo development.

The Terrible: A Storyteller's Memoir

“Devastating and lyrical.” —The New York Times “Suspenseful and affecting.” —The New Yorker From the celebrated poet behind bone, a lyrical memoir—part prose, part verse—about coming-of-age, uncovering the cruelty and beauty of the wider world, and redemption through self-discovery and the bonds of family “You may not run away from the thing that you are because it comes and comes and comes as sure as you breathe.” This is the story of Yrsa Daley-Ward, and all the things that happened—“even the terrible things. And God, there were terrible things.” It’s about her childhood in the northwest of England with her beautiful, careworn mother Marcia; the man formerly known as Dad (half fun, half frightening); and her little brother Roo, who sees things written in the stars. It’s also about the surreal magic of adolescence, about growing up and discovering the power and fear of sexuality, about pitch-gray days of pills and powder and connection. It’s about damage and pain, but also joy. Told with raw intensity and shocking honesty, The Terrible is a memoir of going under, losing yourself, and finding your voice.

Albert Camus the Algerian: Colonialism, Terrorism, Justice

In these original readings of Albert Camus' novels, short stories, and political essays, David Carroll concentrates on Camus' conflicted relationship with his Algerian background and finds important critical insights into questions of justice, the effects of colonial oppression, and the deadly cycle of terrorism and counterterrorism that characterized the Algerian War and continues to surface in the devastation of postcolonial wars today. During France's "dirty war" in Algeria, Camus called for an end to the violence perpetrated against civilians by both France and the Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN) and supported the creation of a postcolonial, multicultural, and democratic Algeria. His position was rejected by most of his contemporaries on the Left and has, ironically, earned him the title of colonialist sympathizer as well as the scorn of important postcolonial critics. Carroll rescues Camus' work from such criticism by emphasizing the Algerian dimensions of his literary and philosophical texts and by highlighting in his novels and short stories his understanding of both the injustice of colonialism and the tragic nature of Algeria's struggle for independence. By refusing to accept that the sacrifice of innocent human lives can ever be justified, even in the pursuit of noble political goals, and by rejecting simple, ideological binaries (West vs. East, Christian vs. Muslim, "us" vs. "them," good vs. evil), Camus' work offers an alternative to the stark choices that characterized his troubled times and continue to define our own. "What they didn't like, was the Algerian, in him," Camus wrote of his fictional double in The First Man. Not only should "the Algerian" in Camus be "liked," Carroll argues, but the Algerian dimensions of his literary and political texts constitute a crucial part of their continuing interest. Carroll's reading also shows why C

Heavy Duty: Days and Nights in Judas Priest

Memoir by the cofounder and former lead guitarist of heavy metal giants Judas Priest Judas Priest formed in the industrial city of Birmingham, England, in 1969. With its distinctive twin-guitar sound, studs-and-leather image, and international sales of over 50 million records, Judas Priest became the archetypal heavy metal band in the 1980s. Iconic tracks like "Breaking the Law," "Living after Midnight," and "You've Got Another Thing Comin'" helped the band achieve extraordinary success, but no one from the band has stepped out to tell their or the band's story until now. As the band approaches its golden anniversary, fans will at last be able to delve backstage into the decades of shocking, hilarious, and haunting stories that surround the heavy metal institution. In Heavy Duty, guitarist K.K. Downing discusses the complex personality conflicts, the business screw-ups, the acrimonious relationship with fellow heavy metal band Iron Maiden, as well as how Judas Priest found itself at the epicenter of a storm of parental outrage that targeted heavy metal in the '80s. He also describes his role in cementing the band's trademark black leather and studs image that would not only become synonymous with the entire genre, but would also give singer Rob Halford a viable outlet by which to express his sexuality. Lastly, he recounts the life-changing moment when he looked at his bandmates on stage during a 2009 concert and thought, "This is the

Chronicles of My Life: An American in the Heart of Japan

"I sometimes think that if, as the result of an accident, I were to lose my knowledge of Japanese, there would not be much left for me. Japanese, which at first had no connection with my ancestors, my literary tastes, or my awareness of myself as a person, has become the central element of my life." In this eloquent and wholly absorbing memoir, the renowned scholar Donald Keene shares more than half a century of his extraordinary adventures as a student of Japan. Keene begins with an account of his bittersweet childhood in New York; then he describes his initial encounters with Asia and Europe and the way in which World War II complicated that experience. He captures the sights, scents, and sounds of Japan as they first enveloped him, and talks of the unique travels and well-known intellectuals who later shaped the contours of his academic career. Keene traces the movement of his passions with delicacy and subtlety, deftly weaving his love for Japan into a larger narrative about identity and home and the circumstances that led a Westerner to find solace in a country on the opposite side of the world. Chronicles of My Life is not only a fascinating tale of two cultures colliding, but also a thrilling account of the emotions and experiences that connect us all, regardless of our individual origins.

Going Gypsy: One Couple's Adventure from Empty Nest to No Nest at All

Almost every couple faces a “now what?” moment as their last kid moves out of the house. There’s a big empty nest looming over this new and uncertain stage in their lives. David and Veronica James chose to look at this next phase of life as a beginning instead of an ending. Rather than staying put and facing the constant reminders of empty bedrooms and backseats, a plan began to develop to sell the nest and hit the highway. But could a homebody helicopter mom learn to let go of her heartstrings and house keys all at once? Filled with a sense of adventure and humor, Going Gypsy is the story of a life after raising kids that is a celebration of new experiences. Pulling the rip cord on the daily grind, David and Veronica throw caution to the wind, quit their jobs, sell their house, put on their vagabond shoes, and go gypsy in a beat-up old RV found on eBay. On a journey of over ten thousand miles along the back roads of America (and a hysterical, error-infused side trip into Italy), they conquer old fears, see new sights, reestablish bonds with family and friends, and transform their relationships with their three grown children from parent-child to adult-to-adult. Most importantly, they rediscover in themselves the fun-loving youngsters who fell in love three decades prior.

Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music

Dolly Parton is instantly recognizable for her iconic style and persona, but how did she create her enduring image? Dolly crafted her exaggerated appearance and stage personality by combining two opposing stereotypes―the innocent mountain girl and the voluptuous sex symbol. Emerging through her lyrics, personal stories, stage presence, and visual imagery, these wildly different gender tropes form a central part of Dolly’s media image and portrayal of herself as a star and celebrity. By developing a multilayered image and persona, Dolly both critiques representations of femininity in country music and attracts a diverse fan base ranging from country and pop music fans to feminists and gay rights advocates. In Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music, Leigh H. Edwards explores Dolly’s roles as musician, actor, author, philanthropist, and entrepreneur to show how Dolly’s gender subversion highlights the challenges that can be found even in the most seemingly traditional form of American popular music. As Dolly depicts herself as simultaneously "real" and "fake," she offers new perspectives on country music’s claims of authenticity.

Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats: Unfinished business

Richard Wainwright, the Liberals and Liberal Democrats: Unfinished Business offers new research on familiar themes involving loyalties of politics, faith and locality. Richard Wainwright was a Liberal MP for seventeen years during the Party's recovery, but his life tells us about much more than this. Wainwright grew up in prosperity, but learned from voluntary work about poverty; he refused to fight in World War Two, but saw war at its cruellest; he joined the Liberal Party when most had given up on it, but gave his fortune to it; lost a by-election but caused the only Labour loss in Harold Wilson's landslide of 1966. He then played a key role in the fall of Jeremy Thorpe, the Lib-Lab Pact and the formation of the SDP-Liberal Alliance and the Liberal Democrats; he represented a unique Yorkshire constituency which reflected his pride and hope for society; and though he gave his life to the battle to be in the Commons, he refused a seat in the Lords. Richard Wainwright is central to the story of the Liberal Party and sheds light on the reasons for its survival and the state of its prospects. At the same time this book is a parable of politics for anyone who wants to represent an apparently lost cause, who wants to motivate people who have been neglected, and who want to follow their convictions at the highest level.

The Big Move: Life Between the Turning Points

When her husband’s ill health forces them to move into an assisted living facility, Anne M. Wyatt-Brown suddenly finds herself surrounded by elderly residents. In this lively and provocative collection, other distinguished gerontologists reflect on Anne’s moving account of her transition to becoming a member of a vibrant and sociable community that offers care-giving support, while encouraging her to pursue her own interests, including exercising, reviewing articles for scholarly journals, serving on committees, and singing. By redefining notions of care and community, undoing the stigmas of aging, and valuing the psychological factors involved in accepting assistance, this volume provides a bold new framework for thinking about aging, continuing care, making the big move to a retirement community, and living with vitality in the new environment.

The Fallen Few of the Battle of Britain

‘Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few’ – Seventy-five years on the unforgettable words of Winston Churchill ring as powerfully as they did in August 1940 when the young men of the RAF stood as the last line of defense against Hitler’s far more powerful Luftwaffe. This emotional yet factual book describes the three and a half months (10 July – 31 October 1940) battle day-by-day and covers the essential details of every one of the 540 young pilots who died in this critical campaign that saved Britain from invasion by the Nazis. Thanks to the authors painstaking research we are given a short biography of each pilots and learn of their actions and the manner of their deaths, their squadrons and planes. The result is a unique record and fitting memorial of the courage and sacrifice of this select band of heroes. The text is enhanced by photographs of the individuals themselves.

Kafka's Last Trial: The Strange Case of a Literary Legacy

The story of the international struggle to preserve Kafka's literary legacy. Kafka's Last Trial begins with Kafka's last instruction to his closest friend, Max Brod: to destroy all his remaining papers upon his death. But when the moment arrived in 1924, Brod could not bring himself to burn the unpublished works of the man he considered a literary genius-even a saint. Instead, Brod devoted his life to championing Kafka's writing, rescuing his legacy from obscurity and physical destruction. The story of Kafka's posthumous life is itself Kafkaesque. By the time of Brod's own death in Tel Aviv in 1968, Kafka's major works had been published, transforming the once little-known writer into a pillar of literary modernism. Yet Brod left a wealth of still-unpublished papers to his secretary, who sold some, held on to the rest, and then passed the bulk of them on to her daughters, who in turn refused to release them. An international legal battle erupted to determine which country could claim ownership of Kafka's work: Israel, where Kafka dreamed of living but never entered, or Germany, where Kafka's three sisters perished in the Holocaust? Benjamin Balint offers a gripping account of the controversial trial in Israeli courts-brimming with dilemmas legal, ethical, and political-that determined the fate of Kafka's manuscripts. Deeply informed, with sharply drawn portraits and a remarkable ability to evoke a time and place, Kafka's Last Trial is at once a brilliant biographical portrait of a literary genius, and the story of two countries whose national obsessions with overcoming the traumas of the past came to a head in a hotly contested trial for the right to claim the literary legacy of one of our modern masters.

The Lives and Exploits of the Most Noted Highwaymen, Rogues and Murderers

For as long as human societies have existed there have always been people who have always transgressed the laws of their respective societies. It seems that whenever new laws are made, certain people find ways to break them. This book will introduce you to some of the most notorious figures, from all parts of the world, who have committed heinous crimes such as highway robbery, murder, and forgery. Beginning with Bulla Felix, the Roman highwayman, this book traces the careers of medieval outlaws such as Robin Hood and Adam Bell. Early modern murderers also make an appearance, such as Sawney Beane, whose story inspired the cult horror movie The Hills Have Eyes (1977). Learn also about the crimes and daring escapes of Jack Sheppard, an eighteenth-century criminal who escaped from prison on several occasions, and find out if the ‘gentlemanly’ highwayman, Dick Turpin, was truly a gentleman. the ruffian Dick Turpin. This book also includes an appendix of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century thieves’ cant, as well as several historical poems, songs, and ballads relating to the subjects discussed, and the work is prefaced with an essay highlighting the significance of crime literature throughout history.

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