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The Antique House Murders (Oakwood Mysteries)

In this irresistible cozy mystery from the USA Today best-selling author of The Book Club Murders, amateur sleuth Charley Carpenter fights to avenge a crime that hits far too close to home. Mulbridge House stood, silent and decaying, deep in the woods at the heart of Oakwood, Ohio, long before the passing of Augusta Mulbridge. Yet suddenly everyone in town seems to have a stake in its fate: the greedy heirs, eager to tear it down for a tidy profit; the local preservationists, determined to maintain it as an historic site; and the angry neighbors, staunchly opposed to the construction of a modern subdivision. Even Charley Carpenter is forced to admit that her beloved shop, Old Hat Vintage Fashions, could use an infusion of the estate's treasures. The clock is ticking. The wrecking ball is ready to swing. All that stands between Mulbridge House and oblivion is one final vote. That and murder... The trouble begins when Charley walks into auctioneer Calvin Prescott's office to find her cherished family friend crumpled on the floor. Detective Marcus Trenault quickly connects his death to a string of increasingly violent burglaries plaguing Oakwood. But when Charley uncovers a link to a massive land swindle worth millions, not to mention a drug ring operating out of the manor's abandoned outbuildings, that theory crumbles faster than Mulbridge House. Now Charley's racing to catch a killer before everything falls apart.

The Mystery of the Kibbutz: Egalitarian Principles in a Capitalist World (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World)

How the kibbutz movement thrived despite its inherent economic contradictions and why it eventually declined The kibbutz is a social experiment in collective living that challenges traditional economic theory. By sharing all income and resources equally among its members, the kibbutz system created strong incentives to free ride or―as in the case of the most educated and skilled―to depart for the city. Yet for much of the twentieth century kibbutzim thrived, and kibbutz life was perceived as idyllic both by members and the outside world. In The Mystery of the Kibbutz, Ran Abramitzky blends economic perspectives with personal insights to examine how kibbutzim successfully maintained equal sharing for so long despite their inherent incentive problems. Weaving the story of his own family’s experiences as kibbutz members with extensive economic and historical data, Abramitzky sheds light on the idealism and historic circumstances that helped kibbutzim overcome their economic contradictions. He illuminates how the design of kibbutzim met the challenges of thriving as enclaves in a capitalist world and evaluates kibbutzim’s success at sustaining economic equality. By drawing on extensive historical data and the stories of his pioneering grandmother who founded a kibbutz, his uncle who remained in a kibbutz his entire adult life, and his mother who was raised in and left the kibbutz, Abramitzky brings to life the rise and fall of the kibbutz movement. The lessons that The Mystery of the Kibbutz draws from this unique social experiment extend far beyond the kibbutz gates, serving as a guide to societies that strive to foster economic and social equality.

Font of Life: Ambrose, Augustine, and the Mystery of Baptism (Emblems of Antiquity)

No two men were more influential in the early Church than Ambrose, the powerful Bishop of Milan, and Augustine, the philosopher from provincial Africa who would write The Confessions and The City of God. Different in background, they were also extraordinarily different in personality. In Font of Life, Garry Wills explores the remarkable moment when their lives intersected at one of the most important, yet rarely visited, sites in the Christian world. Hidden under the piazza of the Duomo in Milan lies part of the foundations of a fourth-century cathedral where, at dawn on Easter of 387, Augustine and a group of people seeking baptism gathered after an all-night vigil. Ambrose himself performed the sacrament and the catechumens were greeted by their fellows in the faith, which included Augustine's mother Monnica. Though the occasion had deep significance for the participants, this little cluster of devotees was unaware that they were creating the future of the Western church. Ambrose would go on to forge new liturgies, new forms of church music, and new chains of churches; Augustine would return to Africa to become Bishop of Hippo and one of the most influential writers of Christianity. Garry Wills uses the ancient baptistry to chronicle a pivotal chapter in the history of the Church, highlighting the often uncomfortable relationship between the two church fathers and exploring the mystery and meanings of the sacrament of baptism. In addition, he brings long overdue attention to an unjustly neglected landmark of early Christianity.

The Mystery of Sleep: Why a Good Night's Rest Is Vital to a Better, Healthier Life

An authoritative and accessible guide to what happens when we shut our eyes at night We spend a third of our lives in bed, but how much do we really understand about how sleep affects us? In the past forty years, scientists have discovered that our sleep (or lack of it) can affect nearly every aspect of our waking lives. Poor sleep could be a sign of a disease, the result of a vitamin or iron deficiency, or the cause of numerous other problems, both sleeping and waking. Yet many people, even medical personnel, are unaware of the dangers of poor sleep. Enter Dr. Meir Kryger, a world authority on the science of sleep, with a comprehensive guide to the mysteries of slumber that combines detailed case studies, helpful tables, illustrations, and pragmatic advice. Everyone needs a good night’s sleep, and many of us will experience some difficulty sleeping or staying awake over the course of our lifetimes (or know someone who does). Kryger’s comprehensive text is a much‑needed resource for insomniacs; for those who snore, can’t stay awake, or experience disturbing dreams; and for the simply curious. Uniquely wide ranging, The Mystery of Sleep is more than a handbook; it is a guide to the world of sleep and the mysterious disorders that affect it.

Plausible Denial: Was the CIA Involved in the Assassination of JFK?

The assassination of President Kennedy in 1963 continues to be shrouded in mystery and controversy. In Plausible Denial, Mark Lane, the author of Rush to Judgment, the provocative and bestselling critique of the Warren Commission, reveals startling evidence about the CIA’s involvement in a plot to murder the president. In 1978, when a small magazine ran a story by CIA renegade Victor Marchetti linking ex-CIA operative and convicted Watergate burglar E. Howard Hunt to the assassination, Hunt sued for defamation. Lane signed on as defense counsel for the publication, and set out to prove the truth of the allegations against Hunt and the CIA. Lane’s investigation uncovered a web of conspiracy that involved anti-Castro Cubans, Watergate conspirators, and public officials at the highest levels of the intelligence community. The forewoman of the jury, Leslie Armstrong, stated that “Mr. Lane was asking us to do something very difficult. He was asking us to believe that John Kennedy had been killed by our own government. Yet when we examined the evidence, we were compelled to conclude that the CIA had indeed killed President Kennedy.” Meticulously documented and compellingly written, this book makes public the contents of this curiously unpublicized trial, the only jury verdict directly related to the theory that the CIA was involved in the assassination.

Deciphering Ancient Minds: The Mystery of San Bushmen Rock Art

Goes to the heart of contemporary arguments about the "primitive" and the "modern" minds, and draws new social, anthropological, and ethnographic conclusions about the nature of ancient societies. How did ancient peoples―those living before written records―think? Were their thinking patterns fundamentally different from ours today? Researchers over the years have certainly believed so. Along with the Aborigines of Australia, the indigenous San people of southern Africa―among the last hunter-gatherer societies on Earth―became iconic representatives of all our distant ancestors and were viewed as either irrational fantasists or childlike, highly spiritual conservationists. Since the 1960s a new wave of research among the San and their world-famous rock art has overturned these misconceived ideas. Here, the great authority David Lewis-Williams and his colleague Sam Challis reveal how analysis of the rock paintings and engravings can be made to yield vital insights into San beliefs and ways of thought. This is possible because we possess comprehensive transcriptions, made in the nineteenth century, of interviews with San informants who were shown copies of the art and gave their interpretations of it. Using the analogy of the Rosetta Stone, the authors move back and forth between these San texts and the rock art, teasing out the subtle meanings behind both. The picture that emerges is very different from past analysis: this art is not a naive narrative of daily life but rather is imbued with power and religious depth. 29 color and 68 black-and-white illustrations

The Mystery of Atlantis (Unsolved! (Paperback))

More than 2,300 years ago, the Greek philosopher Plato wrote about a glorious ancient city that sank without trace beneath the waves. Ever since that time people have wondered where this lost city, Atlantis, might be and whether it actually existed. This stirring book looks at all the evidence, examining the different theories behind the lost city of Atlantis.

The Missing Girl
The Missing Girl Sented by Michael

'A gripping debut from a serious new talent . . .' Erin Kelly on Jenny Quintana’s The Missing GirlWhen Anna Flores' adored older sister goes missing as a teenager, Anna copes by disappearing too, just as soon as she can: running as far away from her family as possible, and eventually building a life for herself abroad. Thirty years later, the death of her mother finally forces Anna to return home. Tasked with sorting through her mother's possessions, she begins to confront not just her mother's death, but also the huge hole Gabriella's disappearance left in her life – and finds herself asking a question she's not allowed herself to ask for years: what really happened to her sister? With that question comes the revelation that her biggest fear isn't discovering the worst; it's never knowing the answer. But is it too late for Anna to uncover the truth about Gabriella's disappearance?

Mystery on the Isles of Shoals: Closing the Case on the Smuttynose Ax Murders of 1873

For the first time, the full story of a crime that has haunted New England since 1873. The cold-blooded ax murder of two innocent Norwegian women at their island home off the coast of New Hampshire has gripped the region since 1873, beguiling tourists, inspiring artists, and fueling conspiracy theorists. The killer, a handsome Prussian fisherman down on his luck, was quickly captured, convicted in a widely publicized trial, and hanged in an unforgettable gallows spectacle. But he never confessed and, while in prison, gained a circle of admirers whose blind faith in his innocence still casts a shadow of doubt. A fictionalized bestselling novel and a Hollywood film have further clouded the truth. Finally a definitive "whydunnit" account of the Smuttynose Island ax murders has arrived. Popular historian J. Dennis Robinson fleshes out the facts surrounding this tragic robbery gone wrong in a captivating true crime page-turner. Robinson delves into the backstory at the rocky Isles of Shoals as an isolated centuries-old fishing village was being destroyed by a modern luxury hotel. He explores the neighboring island of Appledore where Victorian poet Celia Thaxter entertained the elite artists and writers of Boston. It was Thaxter's powerful essay about the murders in the Atlantic Monthly that shocked the American public. Robinson goes beyond the headlines of the burgeoning yellow press to explore the deeper lessons about American crime, justice, economics, and hero worship. Ten years before the Lizzie Borden ax murder trial and the fictional Sherlock Holmes, Americans met a sociopath named Louis Wagner—and many came to love him.

A Fist Around the Heart
A Fist Around the Heart Sented by Shon

The mystery surrounding Anna Grieve and her mentally fragile older sister, Esther, begins in Russia in the 1880s. The persecution of Jews has become so vicious that the girls’ mother decides to send her children to Winnipeg with her wealthy employers. Her intention is to join them, but the sisters never see their parents again. Frightened and cut adrift, each girl reacts differently to her new family in North America. Esther’s beauty and glamorous lifestyle hide the fact that she is losing herself to mental illness brought on by a trauma during her childhood in Russia. Anna does not understand the depth of her sister's torment, and spends her life torn between taking care of her and escaping her. As soon as she can, Anna leaves for New York and makes a new life as a women’s rights activist with an illegal contraceptive business in Manhattan. When Anna receives the unexpected news of Esther’s apparent suicide on If Day in Winnipeg - the day a simulated Nazi attack took place to raise money for war bonds - she returns to the city to face the possibility that If Day and Esther's early trauma are inexorably linked to her death.

Killer On The Train (A Hank Carson Mystery Series) (Volume 1)

If you've been to the beautiful Napa Valley, the title alone will draw you into this entertaining mystery. The Wine Train is a favorite trip for locals and visitors alike. With lunch or dinner parties that run almost daily, a delightful addition to any tour of the area. The unique event in this story is different, and it’s the inaugural trip to honor and unveil several new and exciting wines grown in the valley. Tickets to the special event sold out early. This train trip is all about tasting the new flavors, along with delightful food. At least until a bar helper found a body; the victim was a very unkind and disliked restaurant and wine critic, David Hatchett. The suspect list jumps to include 230 people on the train. A murder has a way of changing a person's mood. Which brings us to our featured character, Hank Carson. On board to write a freelance article about the event. He asks a few questions for his article before a steward tells Charles Beaumont, the promoter, there's a body in the wine cooler. Fortunately for the investigators, Hank, a retired LA police detective, assumed the role to protect the scene of the crime. Hank offered to take part in the investigation, in the search for a killer, and his attraction to Alicia Tomlinson, the lead Agent in charge. Interviewing a trainload of suspects was a time-consuming and confusing activity. As they check and cross check alibis to eliminate suspects, what they find narrows the field but increases the mystery. Later they learn a passenger went missing before the passenger interviews. If you enjoy good police procedural stories, you’ll enjoy this book. An all-around entertaining read. If you know the wine train, you will enjoy the setting. It is fast and fun, with likable characters. A good start to the new series from Bruce Alan Jensen. If you like your mysteries spiced with romance, you'll love this one.

The Trinity: The Central Mystery of Christianity (South Asian Theology)

In the last thirty years, books on the Trinity have abounded. There seems to be a fascination with this mysterious topic, especially among systematic theologians. The topic has been mined for many different interests, from liberation theology to feminist interpretations of the Christian heritage and from neo-Reformation theology to interreligious dialogue. This book has no intention of adding to the plethora of treatises on the Trinity. The main question with which it is concerned is what is really scripturally tenable with regard to the Trinity and what is unwarranted theological construction or even speculation. Through this question, Schwarz tries to discern whether the theological assertions made about the Trinity are in line with the biblical base from which they are derived, or whether they have veered off in a more or less questionable direction. What takes shape here is a story: how the doctrine of the Trinity developed over the subsequent centuries from the traces in Scripture to a centralized dogma at the heart of Christian teaching. We witness in this an evolution from proclamation to controversy to speculation. What are we to make of this doctrine? How do we articulate the biblical faith today?

The Mystery of Hamlet: A Solution

Hamlet kills Polonius thinking he is Claudius. Yet he cannot kill Claudius. Why? 'Why does Hamlet attend the German university at Wittenberg? And why study at a university at all? An incorrigible symbolist, Shakespeare must secretly import what he does not openly impart.' Shakespeare understood the Freudian slip centuries before Dr. Freud in Vienna. Twice he employs it to give us hints. 'Prince Hamlet is a disillusioned idealist, a vital key to his generous, passionate, and tragically conscientious character.'

The Apple Pie Alibi: A Culinary Mystery

When Winnie Kepler trades in her business degree for a part-time gig at her grandma Velma's diner, she realizes that her new career choice is perhaps not the best recipe for success. Everything changes when a rookie cop walks into the diner and announces that Velma has chopped a fellow chef at the town fair's annual cooking competition. With the town's crotchety old police captain hell-bent on charging Velma with murder, Winnie shelves her spatula to investigate and clear Velma's good name. She soon discovers that every competitor had a motive to kill the victim. As an old friend in need makes an unexpected visit, Winnie finds that time is quickly running out to save Velma. Unless she can prove . . . The Apple Pie Alibi!

Mystery of the Magi: The Quest to Identify the Three Wise Men

"How utterly refreshing and encouraging to read Fr. Longenecker's extraordinary ruminations on something we all thought we understood, and obviously hardly begin to understand, until now. That he has dug so deep—so we can see things we have never seen before—is a testament both to his archaeological implacability and genius and to the happy fact that God has hidden endless treasures in the Scriptures for our benefit. —Eric Metaxas, New York Times bestselling author of Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy and Martin Luther Modern biblical scholars tend to dismiss the Christmas story of the “wise men from the East” as pious legend. Matthew’s gospel offers few details, but imaginative Christians filled out the story early on, giving us the three kings guided by a magical star who join the adoring shepherds in every Christmas crèche. For many scholars, then, there is no reason to take the gospel story seriously. But are they right? Are the wise men no more than a poetic fancy? In an astonishing feat of detective work, Dwight Longenecker makes a powerful case that the visit of the Magi to Bethlehem really happened. Piecing together the evidence from biblical studies, history, archeology, and astronomy, he goes further, uncovering where they came from, why they came, and what might have happened to them after eluding the murderous King Herod. In the process, he provides a new and fascinating view of the time and place in which Jesus Christ chose to enter the world. The evidence is clear and compelling. The mysterious Magi from the East were in all likelihood astrologers and counselors from the court of the Nabatean king at Petra, where the Hebrew messianic prophecies were well known. The “star” that inspired their journey was a particular planetary alignment—confirmed by computer models—that in the astrological lore of the time portended the birth of a Jewish king. The visitors whose arrival troubled Herod “and all Jerusalem with him” may not have been the turbaned oriental kings of the Christmas carol, but they were real, and by demonstrating that the wise men were no fairy tale, Mystery of the Magi demands a new level of respect for the historical claims of the gospel.

Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness

"An obsessive, mystical, terrifying, and even phantasmagorical exploration of anesthesia’s shadowy terra incognita." ―The New Yorker Anesthetize: to render insensible First there’s the injection, then the countdown―and next thing you know, you’re awake. Anesthesia: The Gift of Oblivion and the Mystery of Consciousness is the story of the time in between, an exploration of that most crucial and baffling gift of modern medicine: the disappearing act that enables us to undergo procedures that would otherwise be impossibly, often fatally, painful. In the past 150 years, anesthesia has made surgical intervention routine, from open-heart surgery to the facelift. But how much do anesthesiologists really know about what happens when their patients go under? Can we hear and retain what’s going on? Is pain still pain if we don’t remember it? How does the unconscious mind deal with the body’s experience of being sliced open and ransacked―and how can we help ourselves through it all? Kate Cole-Adams weaves her own personal experiences with surgery and its aftermath with the explorations and personal accounts of others, doctors and patients alike―accounts of people who wake under the knife, who experience traumatic reactions, dreams, hallucinations, and submerged memories―accounts that evoke and illuminate the provisional nature of the self. Haunting, lyrical, sometimes shattering, Cole-Adams leavens science with personal experience, and brings an intensely human curiosity to the unknowable realm beyond consciousness.

Dashiell Hammett: Man of Mystery

Dashiell Hammett changed the face of crime fiction. In five novels published over five years as well as a string of stories, he transformed the mystery genre into literature and left us with the figure of the hard-boiled detective, from the Continental Op to Sam Spade—immortalized on film by Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon—and the more glamorous Thin Man, also made iconic with the aid of Hollywood. A brilliant writer, Hammett was a complex and enigmatic man. After 1934 until his death in 1961, he published no more novels and suffered from a writer’s block that both shamed and maimed him. He is identified with his tough protagonists, but his tuberculosis compromised his masculine identity and alcoholism may have been his answer. A former Pinkerton detective who valued honesty, he was attracted to women who lied outrageously, most notably Lillian Hellman, with whom he conducted a thirty-year affair. A controversial political activist who stood up for civil liberty, he was also a very private man. In this compact new biography, Sally Cline uses fresh research, including interviews with Hammett’s family and Hellman’s heir, to reexamine the life and works of the writer whom Raymond Chandler called “the ace performer.”

Books to Die For: The World's Greatest Mystery Writers on the World's Greatest Mystery Novels

The world’s most beloved mystery writers celebrate their favorite mystery novels in this gorgeously wrought collection, featuring essays by Michael Connelly, Kathy Reichs, Ian Rankin, and more. In the most ambitious anthology of its kind, the world’s leading mystery writers come together to champion the greatest mystery novels ever written. In a series of personal essays that reveal as much about the authors and their own work as they do about the books that they love, over a hundred authors from twenty countries have created a guide that will be indispensable for generations of readers and writers. From Agatha Christie to Lee Child, from Edgar Allan Poe to P. D. James, from Sherlock Holmes to Hannibal Lecter and Philip Marlowe to Lord Peter Wimsey, Books to Die For brings together the best of the mystery world for a feast of reading pleasure, a treasure trove for those new to the genre and for those who believe that there is nothing new left to discover. This is the one essential book for every reader who has ever finished a mystery novel and thought…I want more!

The Mystery: Finding True Love in a World of Broken Lovers

Love Exists. It's for You--and It's Worth Pursuing Rock princess Lacey Sturm wants to share her journey from heartbreak to wholeness with young women. In The Mystery, Sturm helps readers understand that any loving relationship begins with knowing your own identity in Christ. And yet, so many people have learned to define love through their own dysfunctional family, unhealthy relationships, the romances and wrecked relationships of mainstream pop culture, or, sadly, through pornography. Is it any wonder so many people end up brokenhearted, divorced, abused, abusive, or even suicidal? Through personal stories, Sturm shows readers why true love is difficult and often painful but still worth fighting for. She helps women recognize destructive patterns in their relationships, discover a vision for a true and heart-flourishing love, and heal from past wounds. For anyone seeking healthy, loving relationships in our broken world, The Mystery lights the way to the love we were meant for.

Ghosts of Tsavo: Tracking the Mythic Lions of East Africa

1898, Tsavo River Kenya, the British Empire has employed 140 workers to build a railroad bridge. The bridge's construction comes to a violent halt when two maneless lions devour all 140 workers in a savage feeding frenzy that would make headlines›and history—all over the world. Caputo's Ghosts of Tsavo is a new quest for truth about the origins of these near-mythical animals and how they became predators of human flesh.

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