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Fiction

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The Ghost and the Bonesetter
The Ghost and the Bonesetter Sented by Steve Bark

Part of Le Fanu's earliest earliest twelve short stories, written between 1838 and 1840, they purport to be the literary remains of an 18th-century Catholic priest called Father Purcell.

The Drunkard's Dream
The Drunkard's Dream Sented by Jacob

Dreams—What age, or what country of the world has not felt and acknowledged the mystery of their origin and end?

Madam Crowl's Ghost and the Dead Sexton

Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu gained fame as a master creator of horror stories. Indeed, many critics cite Le Fanu as being central to the skyrocketing popularity of the genre during the late Victorian period.

Green Tea
Green Tea Sented by Rebecca

Based on the psThe anonymous narrator, who was trained as a surgeon, has been arranging the papers of his deceased mentor, Dr. Martin Hesselius. One case in particular, from about sixty-four years before, draws his attention; forthwith the narrator presents a set of letters, with a memorandum, that discuss the doctor's efforts to treat a particularly insidious and vexing complaint.

Ghost Stories of Chapelizod
Ghost Stories of Chapelizod Sented by Michael

Ghosy Stories of Chapelizod by Le Fanu was firstly published in the Dublin University Magazine in January 1851.

Dickon the Devil
Dickon the Devil Sented by Musa

This early work by Sheridan Le Fanu was originally published in 1872. Born in Dublin in 1814, he came from a literary family of Huguenot origins; both his grandmother Alicia Sheridan Le Fanu and his great-uncle Richard Brinsley Sheridan were playwrights,

An Authentic Narrative of a Haunted House

The story is told in the first person by a man who has been advised by his doctor to take up residence by the sea. He and his wife are pretty close to invalids. They take their retinue of six servants and their children to their new house. The fun of this story is in the slow suspense Daddy builds up so skillfully and the very matter- of- fact way the story is told.

The Informer
The Informer Sented by Steve Bark

In The Informer there is betrayal within an anarchist group. One of the bloodiest anarchists is both a cultured and art-loving person, a character full of contradictions and strength.

An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street

An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu is told through the eyes of Dick, a medical student who moves with his cousin Tom into his uncle's unoccupied house on Aungier Street, somewhere in Dublin.

When God Laughs & Other Stories

Jack London (January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916), was an American author who wrote The Call of the Wild and other books. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first Americans to make a huge financial success from writing.

Pandemic
Pandemic Sented by Steve Bark

Excerpt-"We call it Thurston's Disease for two perfectly good reasons," Dr. Walter Kramer said. "He discovered it--and he was the first to die of it."

The Turtles of Tasman
The Turtles of Tasman Sented by Sarah Gerdes

A classic collection of short stories, including the following: BY THE TURTLES OF TASMAN, THE ETERNITY OF FORMS, TOLD IN THE DROOLING WARD, THE HOBO AND THE FAIRY, THE PRODIGAL FATHER, THE FIRST POET, FINIS, THE END OF THE STORY.

The Strength of the Strong

Considered by many to be America's finest author, Jack London, had little formal schooling. Initially, he attended school only through the 8th grade, although he was an avid reader, educating himself at public libraries, especially the Oakland Public Library under the tutelage of Ina Coolbrith, who later became the first poet laureate of California.

The Red One
The Red One Sented by Luis

Published two years after his death, The Red One contains four of Jack London's short stories.

The God Of His Fathers & Other Stories

"On every hand stretched the forest primeval, -- the home of noisy comedy and silent tragedy. Here the struggle for survival continued to wage with all its ancient brutality.

The Faith of Men & Other Stories
The Faith of Men & Other Stories Sented by Steve Bark

"The Faith of Men" is a short story collection originally published in 1904 and contains eight of Jack London's adventure tales, all of them set in London's favorite milieu -- the Yukon Territory. "

Tales of the Fish Patrol
Tales of the Fish Patrol Sented by Steve Bark

In this classic collection of stories drawn from his own experiences, author Jack London looks back on his days as a teenager aboard the fishing boats of San Francisco Bay. In the early 1900s, men of all stripes descended on these waters to plunder its rich oyster beds.

Moon-Face & Other Stories
Moon-Face & Other Stories Sented by Luis

"The title story is a short story by Jack London, on the subject of extreme antipathy. The unnamed protagonist of the story has an irrational hatred of John Claverhouse, the moon-face man. He hates really everything about him: his face, his laugh, his entire life, and when he finds out that Claverhouse engages in illegal fishing with dynamite, he works out a scheme to kill him while making it look like an accident...

Dutch Courage And Other Stories
Dutch Courage And Other Stories Sented by Steve Bark

Dutch Courage is a collection of short stories by Jack London that was originally published in 1922, about six years after his death. It gathers together ten stories that had not been included in any of his previous short story collections. The preface by London's widow Charmian, which is more confusing than helpful, states that the common thread that binds these stories together is that they are all suitable for young audiences. Be that as it may, even though many of these stories feature teenaged protagonists and were originally published in boy's pulp magazines like The Youth's Companion, they don't seem as dumbed down or as tame as some of London's more obviously youth-oriented fiction like the short stories in Tales of the Fish Patrol or the novel The Cruise of the Dazzler. However, you won't find the sort of bleak fatalism that permeates famous London works like The Call of the Wild or "To Build a Fire". These stories are all straightforward examples of entertaining adventure fiction, devoid of philosophy or politics.

Children of the Frost
Children of the Frost Sented by Luis

A weary journey beyond the last scrub timber and straggling copses, into the heart of the Barrens where the niggard North is supposed to deny the Earth, are to be found great sweeps of forests and stretches of smiling land. But this the world is just beginning to know. The world's explorers have known it, from time to time, but hitherto they have never returned to tell the world.

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