• Welcome!
Total books

Fiction

Contemporary Fiction
17
Drama
7
Fiction
3899
Historical Fiction
27

Horror-Gothic
136
Humor
38
Mystery, Thriller & Crime
331
Poetry
38

Romance
471
Science Fiction & Fantasy
784
Short Stories
402
Youth
13

Sort by
The Outgoing of the Tide
The Outgoing of the Tide Sented by Musa

Many crime and detective stories, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive.

A Journey of Little Profit

"braw beasts, Leicester every one of them, well-fed and dirt-cheap at the price I gave. So it was with a light heart that I drove them out of the town by the Merchiston Road along by the face of the Pentlands. Two or three friends came with me, all like myself for folly, but maybe a little bit poorer.

Fullcircle
Fullcircle Sented by Emma

Fullcircle was written in the year 1920 by John Buchan. The tale is about an urban couple who gradually give up their hectic ways as they're seduced--perhaps possessed--by the quiet house they've bought in the country

The Issahar Artifacts
The Issahar Artifacts Sented by Steve Bark

Excerpt-I have decided after some thought, to write this journal

Zen
Zen Sented by Musa

The twenty-nine of us were E.T.I. Team 17, whose assignment was the asteroids. We were four years and three months out of Terra, and we'd reached Vesta right on schedule. Ten minutes after landing, we had known that the clod was part of the crust of Planet X -- or Sorn, to give it its right name -- one of the few such parts that hadn't been blown clean out of the Solar System.

Where There's Hope
Where There's Hope Sented by Emma

"If you called me here to tell me to have a child," Mary Pornsen said, "you can just forget about it. We girls have made up our minds."

The Draw
The Draw Sented by Steve Bark

Stories of the old West were filled with bad men who lived by the speed of their gun hand. Well, meet Buck Tarrant, who could outdraw them all. His secret: he didn't even have to reach for his weapon....

Planet of Dreams
Planet of Dreams Sented by Luis

He stood watching while George Atkinson spun around, dark eyes flashing, hair tousled. There was a two days' growth of beard darkening Atkinson's face. "Why, George," Loveral said, swiftly examining the litter of metal and wood which was spread over a table behind Atkinson. There was a home-made hammer in Atkinson's hand. "What have we here, George?" "Something for you," Atkinson said, tightening his fingers about the handle of the hammer. Loveral grinned his famous Loveral grin. "That's fine.

Gone Fishing
Gone Fishing Sented by Musa

This is a classic science fiction short story by James H. Schmitz that first appeared in Analog Science Fact and Fiction. The following passage is part of its intriguing intro: 'There is no predictable correlation between intelligence and ethics, nor is ruthlessness necessarily an evil thing

George Loves Gistla
George Loves Gistla Sented by Luis

“Why don’t you find yourself some nice little American girl,” his father had often repeated.

Salvage in Space
Salvage in Space Sented by Steve Bark

John Stewart Williamson, who wrote as Jack Williamson and sometimes under the pseudonym Will Stewart, was a U.S. writer often referred to as the "Dean of Science Fiction" following the death of Robert A. Heinlein. He won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for science fiction in 2002.

The Thing in the Attic
The Thing in the Attic Sented by Steve Bark

Suddenly, Honath lost his temper. "Lose it, then!" he shouted. "Let us unlearn everything we know only by rote, go back to the beginning, learn all over again, and continue to learn, from our own experience. Spokesman, you are an old man, but there are still some of us who haven't forgotten what curiosity means!" "Quiet!" the Spokesman said. "We have heard enough. We call on Alaskon the Navigator." "Much of the Book is clearly untrue," Alaskon said flatly, rising. "As a handbook of small trades it has served us well. As a guide to how the universe is made, it is nonsense, in my opinion; Honath is too kind to it. I've made no secret of what I think, and I still think it." "And will pay for it," the Spokesman said, blinking slowly down at Alaskon. "Charl the Reader." "Nothing," Charl said, without standing, or even looking up.

Sort by