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The Return
The Return Sented by Luis

An intense, psychologically charged domestic drama, The Return is a brilliant and haunting exploration of the insecurities that lie at the heart of human relationships. When successful businessman Alvan Hervey begins his daily journey back from the city, he has no idea what awaits him at home—for there, on his bedroom table, is a letter from his wife, confessing her ultimate betrayal: she has left him for another man.

The Inn of the Two Witches

“The Inn of the Two Witches” is one of the best-known short stories written by Joseph Conrad (1857-1924).

The idiots
The idiots Sented by Steve Bark

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

An Outpost Of Progress
An Outpost Of Progress Sented by Emma

I There were two white men in charge of the trading station. Kayerts, the chief, was short and fat; Carlier, the assistant, was tall, with a large head and a very broad trunk perched upon a long pair of thin legs. The third man on the staff was a Sierra Leone nigger, who maintained that his name was Henry Price. However, for some reason or other, the natives down the river had given him the name of Makola, and it stuck to him through all his wanderings about the country. He spoke English and French with a warbling accent, wrote a beautiful hand, understood bookkeeping, and cherished in his innermost heart the worship of evil spirits.

The End of Tethe
The End of Tethe Sented by Emma

Joseph Conrad; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the greatest novelists to write in the English language. He joined the British merchant marine in 1878, and was granted British nationality in 1886. Though he did not speak English fluently until he was in his twenties, he was a master prose stylist who brought a non-English sensibility into English literature. He wrote stories and novels, many with a nautical setting, that depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of an impassive, inscrutable universe.

A Smile of Fortun
A Smile of Fortun Sented by Emma

Embarking in the tropics, a ship's captain makes the instant acquaintance of a seemingly genial Mr. Jacobus and his irritable brother. One a respectable businessman with a considerable reputation, the other a confessed rogue and entrepreneur with no reputation left to lose, the captain is at a loss to determine which he should befriend.

An Anarchist
An Anarchist Sented by Steve Bark

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages.

The Enchanted Typewriter
The Enchanted Typewriter Sented by Emma

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Cogito, Ergo Sum
Cogito, Ergo Sum Sented by Luis

Are the Spirit and the Flesh one and the same thing? Or are they separate entities, dependent and at the same time independent of each other?

The Grove of Ashtaroth
The Grove of Ashtaroth Sented by Sarah Gerdes

Superficially (actually, more than superficially) this story bears a resemblance to the work of Algernon Blackwood.

Space
Space Sented by Sarah Gerdes

A moody kind of horror story.

Where There's Hope
Where There's Hope Sented by Musa

"If you called me here to tell me to have a child," Mary Pornsen said, "you can just forget about it. We girls have made up our minds."

What Rough Beast?
What Rough Beast? Sented by Musa

Harry Houdini asks Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to help him expose Maximillian Cairo—a spiritualist medium. But the two men underestimate Cairo. He's a master of the occult and the most debauched man in London. When they interrupt a magic ritual, a force for ecstasy and chaos explodes on an unsuspecting 1903 London.

George Loves Gistla
George Loves Gistla Sented by Steve Bark

“Why don’t you find yourself some nice little American girl,” his father had often repeated.

The Thing in the Attic
The Thing in the Attic Sented by Sarah Gerdes

Suddenly, Honath lost his temper. "Lose it, then!" he shouted. "Let us unlearn everything we know only by rote, go back to the beginning, learn all over again, and continue to learn, from our own experience. Spokesman, you are an old man, but there are still some of us who haven't forgotten what curiosity means!" "Quiet!" the Spokesman said. "We have heard enough. We call on Alaskon the Navigator." "Much of the Book is clearly untrue," Alaskon said flatly, rising. "As a handbook of small trades it has served us well. As a guide to how the universe is made, it is nonsense, in my opinion; Honath is too kind to it. I've made no secret of what I think, and I still think it." "And will pay for it," the Spokesman said, blinking slowly down at Alaskon. "Charl the Reader." "Nothing," Charl said, without standing, or even looking up.

A Choice of Miracles
A Choice of Miracles Sented by Steve Bark

You're down in the jungle with death staring you in the face. There is nothing left but prayer. So you ask for your life.

One-Shot
One-Shot Sented by Carlos

You can do a great deal if you have enough data, and enough time to compute on it, by logical methods.

The Turtles of Tasman
The Turtles of Tasman Sented by Rebecca

John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life"

The House of Pride
The House of Pride Sented by Sarah Gerdes

John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

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