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Phi: A Voyage from the Brain to the Soul

From one of the most original and influential neuroscientists at work today, here is an exploration of consciousness unlike any other—as told by Galileo, who opened the way for the objectivity of science and is now intent on making subjective experience a part of science as well. Galileo’s journey has three parts, each with a different guide. In the first, accompanied by a scientist who resembles Francis Crick, he learns why certain parts of the brain are important and not others, and why consciousness fades with sleep. In the second part, when his companion seems to be named Alturi (Galileo is hard of hearing; his companion’s name is actually Alan Turing), he sees how the facts assembled in the first part can be unified and understood through a scientific theory—a theory that links consciousness to the notion of integrated information (also known as phi). In the third part, accompanied by a bearded man who can only be Charles Darwin, he meditates on how consciousness is an evolving, developing, ever-deepening awareness of ourselves in history and culture—that it is everything we have and everything we are. Not since Gödel, Escher, Bach has there been a book that interweaves science, art, and the imagination with such originality. This beautiful and arresting narrative will transform the way we think of ourselves and the world.

The Third Lens: Metaphor and the Creation of Modern Cell Biology

Does science aim at providing an account of the world that is literally true or objectively true? Understanding the difference requires paying close attention to metaphor and its role in science. In The Third Lens, Andrew S. Reynolds argues that metaphors, like microscopes and other instruments, are a vital tool in the construction of scientific knowledge and explanations of how the world works. More than just rhetorical devices for conveying difficult ideas, metaphors provide the conceptual means with which scientists interpret and intervene in the world. Reynolds here investigates the role of metaphors in the creation of scientific concepts, theories, and explanations, using cell theory as his primary case study. He explores the history of key metaphors that have informed the field and the experimental, philosophical, and social circumstances under which they have emerged, risen in popularity, and in some cases faded from view. How we think of cells—as chambers, organisms, or even machines—makes a difference to scientific practice. Consequently, an accurate picture of how scientific knowledge is made requires us to understand how the metaphors scientists use—and the social values that often surreptitiously accompany them—influence our understanding of the world, and, ultimately, of ourselves. The influence of metaphor isn’t limited to how we think about cells or proteins: in some cases they can even lead to real material change in the very nature of the thing in question, as scientists use technology to alter the reality to fit the metaphor. Drawing out the implications of science’s reliance upon metaphor, The Third Lens will be of interest to anyone working in the areas of history and philosophy of science, science studies, cell and molecular biology, science education and communication, and metaphor in general.

The Earth's orbit (Space exploration.) (Volume 1)

Despite the fact that year 2018 has recently begun, it has already been marked by a number of important events in Cosmonautics. Many important events also await us in the near future. Humanity is becoming more confident in exploring space, and Cosmonautics has long become an indispensable branch in people's lives. This book will tell you about how humanity has made its first steps in conquering outer space. About how the first rocket took off, how the first spacecraft sent its signal to Earth, how people flew into space, how different countries, such as the USA, the European Union, China, Japan, India, Russia, master space technologies, and as well as many other things related to human activities in the Earth’s orbit. The book contains more than 120 illustrations, of which more than 20 illustrations of space rockets and more than 40 illustrations of other spacecrafts, such as space ships, satellites, stations, etc. The book is intended for older children, but it will also be of interest to any adult who is interested in the modern successes of Astronautics.

Underlying Standards that Support Population Health Improvement (HIMSS Book Series)

This book highlights success stories and challenges to implementing health IT standards. The narrative of each chapter demonstrates how standards further interoperable health data exchange, especially in the service of advancing tools to monitor population health. These are critical stories that demonstrate to an international community of health and IT experts how to bring the right stakeholders together and bridge classic divides between software architects and clinical end users, health system decision-makers and standard authors.

Molecular Physical Chemistry: A Concise Introduction

Molecular Physical Chemistry: A Concise Introduction focuses on two main aspects of physical chemistry: thermodynamics and reaction dynamics. By looking at the properties of the atoms and molecules that constitute matter, it makes use of results from modern experiments conducted on small numbers of molecules. These molecular properties allow the behaviour of larger groups of molecules to be predicted. This is in contrast to conventional approaches which are based upon how the subjects have developed historically. It attempts to show how some basic concepts can be easily applied to give verifiable results in simple systems before extending them to more complicated scenarios. The text is intended as an aid to understanding these central topics of physical chemistry, rather than an introduction to them, and some familiarity with them is assumed throughout. Worked examples and problems are given at the end of each chapter. Molecular Physical Chemistry: A Concise Introduction will be welcomed by graduate and advanced undergraduate students, as well as lecturers. Upon completion of this book the reader will see its subject matter as an integral part of their whole approach to chemistry. "Professor McLauchlin is certainly owed a debt of gratitude by the chemical community for this effort to bring enjoyment and understanding to the future generation. It will be interesting to see if this experiment helps students replace the fear of physical chemistry by an appreciation of its power and beauty." Professor William Klemperer, University of Harvard

Matrix Theory and Applications for Scientists and Engineers (Dover Books on Mathematics)

A comprehensive text on matrix theory and its applications, this book is intended for a broad range of students in mathematics, engineering, and other areas of science at the university level. Author Alexander Graham avoids a simple catalogue of techniques by exploring the concepts' underlying principles as well as their numerous applications. Many problems elucidate the text, which includes a substantial answer section at the end. The treatment explores matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, and the rank and determinant of a matrix. Additional topics include linear equations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, canonical forms and matrix functions, and inverting a matrix. A Solution to Problems Section, References and a Bibliography conclude the treatment.

Knowledge in Motion: Constellations of Learning Across Time and Place (Amerind Studies in Archaeology)

Spirit mediums of East Africa. Healers and fishermen of the Amazon River Basin. Potters of the American Southwest. People contending with climate change long ago. All share “knowledge in motion,” a process of drawing on experiences past and present while engaging in daily practice in relation to contexts of time, place, and power. In the last twenty-five years, scholars from a number of disciplines have explored “situated learning,” specifically investigating how learning relates to social reproduction and daily life. In Knowledge in Motion, contributors focus on learning through time and at a variety of scales, particularly as they relate to power and politics, with implications for emergent communities and constellations of practice. This volume brings together archaeologists, historians, and cultural anthropologists to examine communities engaged in a range of learning practices around the globe, from Africa to the Americas. Contributors draw on the growing interdisciplinary scholarship on situated learning to explore those processes in relation to power and broader forces that shape knowledge during times of turbulent change. Enriching the diversity of regions and disciplines, Knowledge in Motion focuses on how learning, knowledge transmission, and the emergent qualities of communities and constellations of practice are shaped by changing spheres of interaction or other unstable events and influences. The contributions forge productive theories and methodologies for exploring situated learning and its broad-ranging outcomes.

Echoes of Life: What Fossil Molecules Reveal about Earth History

In 1936 a German chemist identified certain organic molecules that he had extracted from ancient rocks and oils as the fossil remains of chlorophyll--presumably from plants that had lived and died millions of years in the past. It was another twenty-five years before this insight was developed and the term "biomarker" coined to describe fossil molecules whose molecular structures could reveal the presence of otherwise elusive organisms and processes. Echoes of Life is the story of these molecules and how they are illuminating the history of the earth and its life. It is also the story of how a few maverick organic chemists and geologists defied the dictates of their disciplines and--at a time when the natural sciences were fragmenting into ever-more-specialized sub-disciplines--reunited chemistry, biology and geology in a common endeavor. The rare combination of rigorous science and literary style--woven into a historic narrative that moves naturally from the simple to the complex--make Echoes of Life a book to be read for pleasure and contemplation, as well as education.

Computational Matter (Natural Computing Series)

This book is concerned with computing in materio: that is, unconventional computing performed by directly harnessing the physical properties of materials. It offers an overview of the field, covering four main areas of interest: theory, practice, applications and implications. Each chapter synthesizes current understanding by deliberately bringing together researchers across a collection of related research projects. The book is useful for graduate students, researchers in the field, and the general scientific reader who is interested in inherently interdisciplinary research at the intersections of computer science, biology, chemistry, physics, engineering and mathematics.

Bayesian Disease Mapping: Hierarchical Modeling in Spatial Epidemiology (Chapman & Hall/CRC Interdisciplinary Statistics)

Focusing on data commonly found in public health databases and clinical settings, Bayesian Disease Mapping: Hierarchical Modeling in Spatial Epidemiology provides an overview of the main areas of Bayesian hierarchical modeling and its application to the geographical analysis of disease. The book explores a range of topics in Bayesian inference and modeling, including Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, Gibbs sampling, the Metropolis–Hastings algorithm, goodness-of-fit measures, and residual diagnostics. It also focuses on special topics, such as cluster detection; space-time modeling; and multivariate, survival, and longitudinal analyses. The author explains how to apply these methods to disease mapping using numerous real-world data sets pertaining to cancer, asthma, epilepsy, foot and mouth disease, influenza, and other diseases. In the appendices, he shows how R and WinBUGS can be useful tools in data manipulation and simulation. Applying Bayesian methods to the modeling of georeferenced health data, Bayesian Disease Mapping proves that the application of these approaches to biostatistical problems can yield important insights into data.

Finding Purpose in a Godless World: Why We Care Even If the Universe Doesn't

A psychiatrist presents a compelling argument for how human purpose and caring emerged in a spontaneous and unguided universe. Can there be purpose without God? This book is about how human purpose and caring, like consciousness and absolutely everything else in existence, could plausibly have emerged and evolved unguided, bottom-up, in a spontaneous universe. A random world--which according to all the scientific evidence and despite our intuitions is the actual world we live in--is too often misconstrued as nihilistic, demotivating, or devoid of morality and meaning. Drawing on years of wide-ranging, intensive clinical experience as a psychiatrist, and his own family experience with cancer, Dr. Lewis helps readers understand how people cope with random adversity without relying on supernatural belief. In fact, as he explains, although coming to terms with randomness is often frightening, it can be liberating and empowering too. Written for those who desire a scientifically sound yet humanistic view of the world, Lewis's book examines science's inroads into the big questions that occupy religion and philosophy. He shows how our sense of purpose and meaning is entangled with mistaken intuitions that events in our lives happen for some intended cosmic reason and that the universe itself has inherent purpose. Dispelling this illusion, and integrating the findings of numerous scientific fields, he shows how not only the universe, life, and consciousness but also purpose, morality, and meaning could, in fact, have emerged and evolved spontaneously and unguided. There is persuasive evidence that these qualities evolved naturally and without mystery, biologically and culturally, in humans as conscious, goal-directed social animals. While acknowledging the social and psychological value of progressive forms of religion, the author respectfully critiques even the most sophisticated theistic arguments for a purposeful universe. Instead, he offers an evidence-based, realistic yet optimistic and empathetic perspective. This book will help people to see the scientific worldview of an unguided, spontaneous universe as awe-inspiring and foundational to building a more compassionate society.

The Male Genitalia: the Role of the Narrator in Psychiatric Notes, 1890-1990, v. 2, First Series

Medical problems of the male genitals are extremely common and male health is assuming a new importance as men are increasingly recognising the need to look after their bodies. The rates of sexually transmitted infections are rising rapidly in many countries, including a dramatic increase in HIV infection and the recent resurgence of syphilis.Patients with genital disease often present to their general practitioner, sexual health clinics, dermatology departments and urology clinics, and this quick reference guide aids easy diagnosis.Fully illustrated, with colour photographs, this is the ideal volume for anyone dealing with men with genital rashes, skin lesions and sexually transmitted diseases. It covers, in detail, the broad area of male genital disease encompassing dermatology and genito-urinary medicine.

Ideas toward a Phenomenology of Interruptions

This text is the first book-length analysis of the problem of the relations between time, sleep, and the body in Husserl’s phenomenology. Ideas toward a Phenomenology of Interruptions reconfigures the unity of the life of subjectivity in light of the phenomenon of dreamless sleep, supplements Husserl’s analyses of subjectivity through integrating interruptions into the life of consciousness, and establishes a new phenomenological concept of subjectivity, that is, a fractured subject. In analyzing the phenomenon of dreamless sleep, the author develops a new theory of the body, namely, the sleeping-body, and explains the importance of the lived-body in the experience and constitution of time. The author analyzes the moments of falling asleep and waking up, as well as the period of dreamless sleep, and shows that a more complete phenomenological concept of subjectivity requires attention to the interweaving of continuity and discontinuity. This project therefore aims to provide a critical counterpart to Husserl’s analyses by developing his transcendental phenomenology into a phenomenology of interruptions. Through this account of dreamless sleep, this text shows furthermore that subjectivity ceases to perceive and experience the flow of time through retention, protention, and the primal impression, and that the time that is not lived through during this period is lost time. Moreover, it explores the methodological consequences of interruptions for phenomenology, and shows that phenomenology reaches its limits in the phenomena of dreamless sleep because it is incapable of fully accessing or accounting for them through the phenomenological reduction.

Quantum Economics: The New Science of Money

A decade after the financial crisis, there is a growing consensus that economics has failed and needs to go back to the drawing board. David Orrell argues that it has been trying to solve the wrong problem all along. Economics sees itself as the science of scarcity. Instead, it should be the science of money (which plays a surprisingly small role in mainstream theory). And money is a substance that turns out to have a quantum nature of its own. Just as physicists learn about matter by studying the exchange of particles at the subatomic level, so economics should begin by analysing the nature of money-based transactions. Quantum Economics therefore starts with the meaning of the phrase ‘how much’ - or, to use the Latin word, quantum. From quantum physics to the dualistic properties of money, via the emerging areas of quantum finance and quantum cognition, this profoundly important book reveals that quantum economics is to neoclassical economics what quantum physics is to classical physics - a genuine turning point in our understanding.

The Human: Bare Life and Ways of Life

Why is it important to consider the human today? Exploring this question John Lechte takes inspiration from the interplay of two of Giorgio Agamben's concepts: 'ways of life' and 'bare life'. Stateless people, those who do not have a political community, such as asylum seekers and refugees, are no less human. However the European tradition, represented most clearly in Hannah Arendt's thinking of the opposition between the oikos, as the satisfaction of basic needs, and the polis, as the realm of freedom and glory, proposes the opposite of this. Arendt's famous phrase, 'the right to have rights', means that freedom and full human potential can only be realised in the context of civil society; in short, that only citizens can be fully human. Because Arendt's view is so influential, yet often not acknowledged, it is necessary to undertake a full investigation of the nature and meaning of the human to establish that it is not reducible to the citizen, but is always characterised by a 'way of life' – life mediated by language. The human is never reducible to 'bare life' – a life with no other significance than physical survival. The implications of 'bare life' are investigated through important themes in relation to the human, such as: freedom and necessity, the animal, animality as nature, inclusion and exclusion in politics, the sacred, death and dying, technics and nature, the Same and the Other, the everyday as extraordinary. Journeying through Agamben, Arendt, Bataille, Derrida, Hegel, Heidegger, Husserl, Levinas, Schelling, Simondon, and Stiegler, this is a profound search to reveal the truly human.

Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Phosphatidylinositol Monophosphate 5-kinase 2 in Lateral Root Development, Gravitropism and Salt Tolerance (Springer Theses)

The functional characterization of a key enzyme in the phosphatidylinositol (PI) signaling pathway in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is the focus of the research summarised in this thesis. Moreover, a particular focus is the exploration of the biological functions of Arabidopsis phophatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 (PIP5K2) which catalyzes the synthesis of phophatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, the precursor of two important second messengers (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol). Through molecular and genetic approaches, the author isolated and characterized the expression pattern, physiological functions and the underlying mechanism of Arabidopsis PIP5K2. It is found that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response through modulating auxin accumulation and polar auxin transport and also plays a critical role in salt tolerance. These findings shed new light on the crosstalk between PI signaling and auxin response, both of which have crucial regulatory roles in plant development.

Who Moved My Cheese?: An A-Mazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life

With over 2.5 million copies sold worldwide, Who Moved My Cheese? is a simple parable that reveals profound truths It is the amusing and enlightening story of four characters who live in a maze and look for cheese to nourish them and make them happy. Cheese is a metaphor for what you want to have in life, for example a good job, a loving relationship, money or possessions, health or spiritual peace of mind. The maze is where you look for what you want, perhaps the organisation you work in, or the family or community you live in. The problem is that the cheese keeps moving. In the story, the characters are faced with unexpected change in their search for the cheese. One of them eventually deals with change successfully and writes what he has learned on the maze walls for you to discover. You'll learn how to anticipate, adapt to and enjoy change and be ready to change quickly whenever you need to. Discover the secret of the writing on the wall for yourself and enjoy less stress and more success in your work and life. Written for all ages, this story takes less than an hour to read, but its unique insights will last a lifetime. Spencer Johnson, MD, is one of the world's leading authors of inspirational writing. He has written many New York Times bestsellers, including the worldwide phenomenon Who Moved My Cheese? and, with Kenneth Blanchard, The One Minute Manager. His works have become cultural touchstones and are available in 40 languages.

CBSE Board Class 12 Chemistry Solved Papers (2008 - 17) in Level of Difficulty Chapters with 3 Sample Papers 5th Edition

CBSE Class 12 Chemistry Solved Papers (2008 - 17) in Level of Difficulty Chapters with 3 Sample Papers 5th Edition is altogether a new approach for Practicing, Revising and Mastering Chemistry for Class 12 CBSE Board exams. The book is written by India’s most popular author in Chemistry, Dr. O. P. Agarwal. The book covers solutions to the Chemistry questions that appeared in the 2008 - 2017 Question papers of CBSE Board Delhi/ All India/ Foreign papers. The book provides a unique and innovative chapterisation defined on the basis of Level of Difficulty. Some of the typical chapter names are: Define the following. Explain this phenomenon. What happens when? How will you complete the following? How will you carry out given conversions? How will you distinguish the following by chemical tests? What is the mechanism of the following reactions? Why do the following happen? etc. The book also provides 3 Sample papers with detailed solutions for practice.

Basic Astronomy & the Small Telescope: A Guide to Affordable Astronomy and Astrophotography

Learn how to find and photograph 50+ objects in the night sky using a small telescope and affordable equipment! Includes the moon, the planets, the sun, nebulae, galaxies, clusters, and multiple star systems! A small telescope is a powerful tool… if you know how to use one. This book walks the reader through the basics of astronomy (the sun, the Earth, the moon, the planets, Kepler’s laws, and more), the basic concepts behind how telescopes work (resolution, magnification, parts & accessories, limitations, and more), and how to observe various astronomical targets through a small telescope (the moon, planets, stars, clusters, galaxies, and nebulae). A brief introduction to smartphone and budget-friendly DSLR astrophotography is also included. This book will show the reader affordable ways to pursue astronomy and astrophotography. For example, the book discusses "purchasing used equipment", "what you really need to buy", "how to take astrophotographs without tracking", "how to build your own solar filter", "how to build a simple barn door mount", "how to simply build your own telescopes", and other similar topics. This book also contains a complete messier object table (object, type, season, magnitude, and size), several star/constellation maps, a few moon maps, and other similar tables and data. A great resource for any astronomer! This book is 280 pages long (6"x9") and includes author-generated images to keep the price of the book to a minimum.

Biosynthesis: Aromatic Polyketides, Isoprenoids, Alkaloids (Topics in Current Chemistry)

This book is the second of two volumes that deal with discovery of chemical pathways of biosynthesis of natural products (secondary metabolites). The first volume covered the use of isotopes in biosynthetic research and the formation of enzyme cofactors and reduced polyketides. This second volume describes biosynthesis of aromatic (unreduced) polyketides, enzymes responsible for cyclization of terpenoids (isoprenoids), and biochemical generation of selected classes of alkaloids (prenylated tryptophan, tropane, pyrrolizidine). Knowledge of the pathways and the techniques to elucidate them opens the door to combinatorial biosynthesis as well as to the production of targeted pharmaceutical agents utilizing a combination of chemistry, molecular biology and protein biochemistry.

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