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Parkinson's Disease: Methods and Protocols (Methods in Molecular Medicine)

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder charact- ized clinically by tremor, rigidity, slow movements, and postural instability. Pathologically, dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra bear the brunt of the degeneration, though other neuronal groups can be affected as well. Although Parkinson’s disease is the only neurodegenerative disorder for which effective therapies are available, these treatment options are only symptomatic, do not influence the underlying degenerative process, and are associated with a high incidence of complications, particularly with their long-term use. The progressive nature of the disease and the limitations of its palliative therapies result in significant functional impairment. The chronic disability and the increased prevalence of the disease with the prolongation of life expectancy in developed countries make the social and economic impact of this disease quite high. For- nately, systematic basic and clinical research in this disease has yielded major new advances that render patients’ hopes for a cure considerably closer to reality. The application of molecular biologic methodologies in the study of Parkinson’s disease has begun to have a major impact only in recent years. Con- quently, the utility of these technologies is largely in the research arena, although their clinical applications are now being realized.

Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep

An engrossing examination of the science behind the little-known world of sleep. Like many of us, journalist David K. Randall never gave sleep much thought. That is, until he began sleepwalking. One midnight crash into a hallway wall sent him on an investigation into the strange science of sleep. In Dreamland, Randall explores the research that is investigating those dark hours that make up nearly a third of our lives. Taking readers from military battlefields to children’s bedrooms, Dreamland shows that sleep isn't as simple as it seems. Why did the results of one sleep study change the bookmakers’ odds for certain Monday Night Football games? Do women sleep differently than men? And if you happen to kill someone while you are sleepwalking, does that count as murder? This book is a tour of the often odd, sometimes disturbing, and always fascinating things that go on in the peculiar world of sleep. You’ll never look at your pillow the same way again. 10 illustrations

Meningococcal Disease (Methods in Molecular Medicine)

Meningococcal septicemia and meningitis continue to be important causes of devastating illness, death, and long-term disability in both developed and resource-poor countries of the world. Few diseases have attracted as much public attention, or are as feared by parents and family members, as well as the medical staff who have to care for affected patients. The unexpected and unp- dictable occurrence of the disease in previously healthy children and young adults, its rapid progression, and the frequent occurrence of purpura fulminans with the resulting gangrene of limbs and digits and the requirement for mutilating s- gery, have all heightened both public and medical interest in the disease. Over the past two decades there has been a rapid increase in knowledge of many aspects of meningococcal disease as a result of intensive efforts by workers in many different fields: clinicians have studied the early presenting features and acute pathophysiology of the disorder; clinical scientists have explored the immunopathological mechanisms responsible for disease and have highlighted the important roles played by the host inflammatory response and pro-inflammatory cytokines in mediating damage to blood vessels and organs; microbiologists have developed new diagnostic methods; public health phy- cians and epidemiologists have improved surveillance techniques with the help of molecular tools provided by bacterial population biologists; and basic sci- tists have used the powerful new tools in molecular and cell biology to elucidate virulence mechanisms.

The Infinite Book: A Short Guide to the Boundless, Timeless and Endless

For a thousand years, infinity has proven to be a difficult and illuminating challenge for mathematicians and theologians. It certainly is the strangest idea that humans have ever thought. Where did it come from and what is it telling us about our Universe? Can there actually be infinities? Is matter infinitely divisible into ever-smaller pieces? But infinity is also the place where things happen that don't. All manner of strange paradoxes and fantasies characterize an infinite universe. If our Universe is infinite then an infinite number of exact copies of you are, at this very moment, reading an identical sentence on an identical planet somewhere else in the Universe. Now Infinity is the darling of cutting edge research, the measuring stick used by physicists, cosmologists, and mathematicians to determine the accuracy of their theories. From the paradox of Zeno’s arrow to string theory, Cambridge professor John Barrow takes us on a grand tour of this most elusive of ideas and describes with clarifying subtlety how this subject has shaped, and continues to shape, our very sense of the world in which we live. The Infinite Book is a thoroughly entertaining and completely accessible account of the biggest subject of them all–infinity.

Molecular Pathology Protocols (Methods in Molecular Medicine)

The era of molecular pathology has arrived. From its promising beg- nings in research laboratories, the field has grown, and continues to grow, to become a vital part of the care of an ever-increasing number of patients. Because of its recent emergence from the research taboratory, many molecuIar pathology protocols we still to be found in the primary litcramre, and have not appeared in a text. MO~PCU~Q~ Padhoiogy Protocob contains la- ratory protocoIs that have been developed by many of the authors for use in clinical molecular pathology laboratories and describe in detail Row to perform these assays. This book is therefore intended for clinical laboratory use by medical technologists and pathologists. It will dso be of interest to research workers who are performing these assays. In its broadest meaning, pathology is the study of disease, and therefore it follows that any disease for which the molecular basis is understood would be suitable as a topic for inclusion in this work. When seiecting protocols, it was necessary to place limits on the number of chapters that could be feasibly presented in a single work. Those protoculs that were selected are performed more frequently, or have achieved recognition as having important diagnostic utility in contemporary practice. A decision was made to exclude inherited genetic diseases with certain exceptions, such as those diseases that are associated with thrombotic states and are part of the traditional dumain of pathology.

Geologic Analysis of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Second Edition

Geologists, engineers, and petrophysicists concerned with hydrocarbon production from naturally fractured reservoirs will find this book a valuable tool for obtaining pertinent rock data to evaluate reserves and optimize well location and performance. Nelson emphasizes geological, petrophysical, and rock mechanics to complement other studies of the subject that use well logging and classical engineering approaches. This well organized, updated edition contains a wealth of field and laboratory data, case histories, and practical advice. A great how-to-guide for anyone working with fractured or highly anisotropic reservoirs Provides real-life illustrations through case histories and field and laboratory data

Research for a Future in Space: The Role of Life and Physical Sciences

During its more than 50-year history, NASA's success in human space exploration has depended on the agency's ability to effectively address a wide range of biomedical, engineering, physical sciences, and related obstacles. This achievement is made possible by NASA's strong and productive commitments to life and physical sciences research for human space exploration, and by its use of human space exploration infrastructures for scientific discovery. Research for a Future in Space: The Role of Life and Physical Sciences explains how unique characteristics of the space environment can be used to address complex problems in the life and physical sciences. This booklet also helps deliver both new knowledge and practical benefits for humankind as it embarks on a new era of space exploration. Research for a Future in Space: The Role of Life and Physical Sciences is based on the in depth report, Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era. To learn more about the future of space exploration, visit our catalog page and download this report for free.

Building Community Disaster Resilience Through Private-Public Collaboration (Emergency Preparedness / Disaster Management)

Natural disasters--including hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and floods--caused more than 220,000 deaths worldwide in the first half of 2010 and wreaked havoc on homes, buildings, and the environment. To withstand and recover from natural and human-caused disasters, it is essential that citizens and communities work together to anticipate threats, limit their effects, and rapidly restore functionality after a crisis. Increasing evidence indicates that collaboration between the private and public sectors could improve the ability of a community to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters. Several previous National Research Council reports have identified specific examples of the private and public sectors working cooperatively to reduce the effects of a disaster by implementing building codes, retrofitting buildings, improving community education, or issuing extreme-weather warnings. State and federal governments have acknowledged the importance of collaboration between private and public organizations to develop planning for disaster preparedness and response. Despite growing ad hoc experience across the country, there is currently no comprehensive framework to guide private-public collaboration focused on disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Building Community Disaster Resilience through Private-Public Collaboration assesses the current state of private-public sector collaboration dedicated to strengthening community resilience, identifies gaps in knowledge and practice, and recommends research that could be targeted for investment. Specifically, the book finds that local-level private-public collaboration is essential to the development of community resilience. Sustainable and effective resilience-focused private-public collaboration is dependent on several basic principles that increase communication among all sectors of the community, incorporate flexibility into collaborative networks, and encourage regular reassessment of collaborative missions, goals, and practices.

CALPHAD (Calculation of Phase Diagrams): A Comprehensive Guide, Volume 1 (Pergamon Materials Series)

This monograph acts as a benchmark to current achievements in the field of Computer Coupling of Phase Diagrams and Thermochemistry, often called CALPHAD which is an acronym for Computer CALculation of PHAse Diagrams. It also acts as a guide to both the basic background of the subject area and the cutting edge of the topic, combining comprehensive discussions of the underlying physical principles of the CALPHAD method with detailed descriptions of their application to real complex multi-component materials. Approaches which combine both thermodynamic and kinetic models to interpret non-equilibrium phase transformations are also reviewed.

Assuring a Future U.S.-Based Nuclear and Radiochemistry Expertise

The growing use of nuclear medicine, the potential expansion of nuclear power generation, and the urgent needs to protect the nation against external nuclear threats, to maintain our nuclear weapons stockpile, and to manage the nuclear wastes generated in past decades, require a substantial, highly trained, and exceptionally talented workforce. Assuring a Future U.S.-Based Nuclear and Radiochemistry Expertise examines supply and demand for expertise in nuclear chemistry nuclear science, and radiochemistry in the United States and presents possible approaches for ensuring adequate availability of these skills, including necessary science and technology training platforms. Considering a range of reasonable scenarios looking to the future, none of these areas are likely to experience a decrease in demand for expertise. However, many in the current workforce are approaching retirement age and the number of students opting for careers in nuclear and radiochemistry has decreased dramatically over the past few decades. In order to avoid a gap in these critical areas, increases in student interest in these careers, in the research and educational capacity of universities and colleges, and sector specific on-the-job training will be needed. Concise recommendations are given for actions to avoid a shortage of nuclear chemistry, nuclear scientists, and radiochemists in the future.

Placing Animals: An Introduction to the Geography of Human-Animal Relations (Human Geography in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Applications)

As Julie Urbanik vividly illustrates, non-human animals are central to our daily human lives. We eat them, wear them, live with them, work them, experiment on them, try to save them, spoil them, abuse them, fight them, hunt them, buy and sell them, love them, and hate them. Placing Animals is the first book to bring together the historical development of the field of animal geography with a comprehensive survey of how geographers study animals today. Urbanik provides readers with a thorough understanding of the relationship between animal geography and the larger animal studies project, an appreciation of the many geographies of human-animal interactions around the world, and insight into how animal geography is both challenging and contributing to the major fields of human and nature-society geography. Through the theme of the role of place in shaping where and why human-animal interactions occur, the chapters in turn explore the history of animal geography and our distinctive relationships in the home, on farms, in the context of labor, in the wider culture, and in the wild.

Jellyfish: Ecology, Distribution Patterns and Human Interactions (Fish, Fishing and Fisheries)

Cnidarian jellyfish are among the most elegant and dazzling organisms inhabiting the global aquatic environment, due to their various and sometimes striking colours as well as their long and dense tentacle structures. Despite their extreme beauty, jellyfish are also considered as a very dangerous and venomous organism. Their genetic makeup provides them with batteries of intracellular capsules (nematocysts) produced by the Golgi apparatus of specialized cells (cnidocytes) from which the whole phylum Cnidaria takes the name (from the Greek �ʦ�?�Ħ�, which means "nettle"). As a matter of fact, some of these organisms are known as "sea nettles" and present a considerable amount of danger to bathers and sea-workers in several coastal zones around the world. Therefore, the occurrence of jellyfish blooms constitutes a serious threat from a sanitary and economical point of view, preventing humans from visiting beaches, coasts, and coastal waters by interfering with bathing and other recreational and vocational activities linked to the sea. In addition, the connection between jellyfish outbreaks and global environmental changes has been taken very seriously over the past few years. Indeed, human influence and worsening environmental conditions have induced many species to adapt to new situations, bringing about physiological and behavioural modifications. Notwithstanding these negative aspects, jellyfish are considered a resource to be exploited in the fields of drug discovery and as new prospects for human nutrition in countries where the use of such creatures as a food source is not traditional. This book aims to present an up-to-date view about the research on jellyfish by taking into account their ecological role, dynamics and distribution, health aspects and global implications connected to recurrent outbreaks, and the current and future prospects for utilization of these organisms in the fields of drug discovery, ecotoxicology and human nutrition.

Endangered Species: A Reference Handbook (Contemporary World Issues)

A detailed exploration of the variety of threats that endangered species are facing around the world, whether they are due to human impact or so-called natural causes. • Includes a Perspectives chapter that allows for voices to be heard from many individuals who are concerned with endangered species • Serves general readers who wants to learn more about the history and current events concerning endangered species in an easy-to-understand fashion as well as high school and undergrad students conducting research for reports or projects • Presents facts that enables readers reach their own conclusions regarding the controversies regarding endangered species

The Secret Life of the Owl

'Dusk is filling the valley. It is the time of the gloaming, the owl-light. Out in the wood, the resident tawny has started calling, Hoo-hoo-hoo-h-o-o-o.' There is something about owls. They feature in every major culture from the Stone Age onwards. They are creatures of the night, and thus of magic. They are the birds of ill-tidings, the avian messengers from the Other Side. But owls - with the sapient flatness of their faces, their big, round eyes, their paternal expressions - are also reassuringly familiar. We see them as wise, like Athena's owl, and loyal, like Harry Potter's Hedwig. Human-like, in other words. No other species has so captivated us. In The Secret Life of the Owl, John Lewis-Stempel explores the legends and history of the owl. And in vivid, lyrical prose, he celebrates all the realities of this magnificent creature, whose natural powers are as fantastic as any myth.

The New Equine Economy in the 21st Century (Eaap Publication)

From the time they became domesticated, horses have fulfilled roles imposed by human societies. Changing economies, societies and technologies have transformed the predominant roles held by horses in human life. They are now overwhelmingly employed in improving the quality of human life. Across Europe the status of the horse is evolving as ridership grows, and these changes create new economic opportunities for equine and rural enterprises.The 20 chapters focus on new or developing sectors of the equine economy through sections devoted to impact studies, economic opportunities, socio-economic challenges, social economy, governance issues, sustainable development, the case of horse meat and national reports about the horse in the national economies. The topics range from equine tourism, alternative medicine for competition horses, and the use of social media, through to what may be the most complete guide to the scientific production of horse meat to be published so far.Each chapter provides a glimpse of where the equine economy may go in the 21st Century, based upon the research of experts in their field. No one can predict the future, but the authors give us insight into some of the cutting edge trends which are shaping the nature of the equine world and producing the New Equine Economy of the 21st Century.

Condor: To the Brink and Back--The Life and Times of One Giant Bird

The California condor has been described as a bird "with one wing in the grave." Flying on wings nearly ten feet wide from tip to tip, these birds thrived on the carcasses of animals like woolly mammoths. Then, as humans began dramatically reshaping North America, the continent's largest flying land bird started disappearing. By the beginning of the twentieth century, extinction seemed inevitable. But small groups of passionate individuals refused to allow the condor to fade away, even as they fought over how and why the bird was to be saved. Scientists, farmers, developers, bird lovers, and government bureaucrats argued bitterly and often, in the process injuring one another and the species they were trying to save. In the late 1980s, the federal government made a wrenching decision -- the last remaining wild condors would be caught and taken to a pair of zoos, where they would be encouraged to breed with other captive condors. Livid critics called the plan a recipe for extinction. After the zoo-based populations soared, the condors were released in the mountains of south-central California, and then into the Grand Canyon, Big Sur, and Baja California. Today the giant birds are nowhere near extinct. The giant bird with "one wing in the grave" appears to be recovering, even as the wildlands it needs keep disappearing. But the story of this bird is more than the story of a vulture with a giant wingspan -- it is also the story of a wild and giant state that has become crowded and small, and of the behind-the-scenes dramas that have shaped the environmental movement. As told by John Nielsen, an environmental journalist and a native Californian, this is a fascinating tale of survival.

Inspection and Control of Mediterranean Fishery Products and Live Bivalve Mollusks (Fish, Fishing, and Fisheries)

The fishery products and bivalve mollusks sector is certainly one of the most complex in term of sanitary and commercial topics, considering the high number of species that require a precise identification. For all these reasons, the knowledge and the skills in this field remain prerogative of a few experts on the subject and operators who, in time and for various reasons, have acquired specific knowledge and skills. On the other hand, the evolution of community legislation, and especially the growing worldwide interest for fishery products and bivalve mollusks, requires a common system of traceability and labeling aimed at increasing the transparency in commercial transactions, facilitating the identification of the fish and mollusks species and increasing consumer confidence. In this perspective, the proposed publication stands as an easy reference tool intended for all the stakeholders involved in the Mediterranean seafood chain, and in which some essential elements of the community rules relating to inspection and control of fishery products and bivalve mollusks are revealed. The presence of illustrations will represent a quick and easy way to acquire the essential information to identify the main Mediterranean fishery products and bivalve mollusks of commercial interest.

Forest Ecosystems: Management, Impact Assessment and Conservation (Wildlife Protection, Destruction and Extinction)

This current book reviews and analyzes forest ecosystems. Chapter One begins with a discussion of radioactivity in forest ecosystems. Chapter Two discusses how litter chemistry has significant effects on soil biogeochemistry and looks into the relationships between litter chemistry, soil chemistry and microbial activity. Chapter Three summarizes information about short- and long-term study of the relationship between soil nematode communities as bioindicators of soil health and different types of disturbance forest soil (fallen trees, fire-damaged) and management (cleared and non-extracted windstorm plot). Chapter Four studies the organization of boreal forests in insular volcanic landscapes of the north-west Pacific. Chapter Five concludes the book with an analysis of the changes of snow moisture balance in logging areas in dark-needles forests of the Yenisei Ridge of Central Siberia

Rhetorical Animals: Boundaries of the Human in the Study of Persuasion (Ecocritical Theory and Practice)

For this edited volume, the editors solicited chapters that investigate the place of nonhuman animals in the purview of rhetorical theory; what it would mean to communicate beyond the human community; how rhetoric reveals our "brute roots." In other words, this book investigates themes that enlighten us about likely or possible implications of the animal turn within rhetorical studies. The present book is unique in its focus on the call for nonanthropocentrism in rhetorical studies. Although there have been many hints in recent years that rhetoric is beginning to consider the implications of the animal turn, as yet no other anthology makes this its explicit starting point and sustained objective. Thus, the various contributions to this book promise to further the ongoing debate about what rhetoric might be after it sheds its long-standing humanistic bias.

National Park Service: Analyses and Trends of Appropriations, Fees and Donations (Government Procedures and Operations)

The National Park Service (NPS) administers the National Park System, which covers 84.6 million acres of land and consists of 410 diverse units valued for their natural, cultural, and recreational importance. NPS receives appropriations in the annual Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies appropriations bill. This book discusses NPS appropriations for FY2016 and examines trends in the agency's discretionary appropriations over the past decade (FY2007-FY2016); changes in the size of the National Park System, numbers of recreation visits to the parks, and NPS staffing levels during that period; and budget data for fiscal years 2005 through 2014 on the Park Service's overall funding and fee revenue and donations.

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